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Amazon: ‘Make America Great Again’ Incites Hate, Communist Manifesto Doesn’t

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Amazon banned a pro-Trump coffee brand from advertising on its website due to the potential for the “Make America Great Again” slogan to incite hate, but allows sponsored advertisements of the Communist Manifesto.

Covfefe Coffee, a pro-Trump coffee brand, received a message from Amazon indicating they are now not allowed to advertise their coffee on the website due to the presence of the “Make America Great Again”  slogan on its merchandise.

According to correspondence from Amazon, provided to Big League Politics by Covfefe Coffee, Amazon now requires the company to remove, in the company’s words, “‘Make America Great Again’ and any type of profanity of hatred inciting text”, and any other material on the ads that could be perceived as political advocacy.

Trending: LEAKED AUDIO: Joe Biden Laughs with Former Ukrainian President about Sabotaging Trump’s Campaign in 2016

The email from Amazon suggested this is the company’s standard policy, however, research reveals Amazon allows numerous radical leftist publications to advertise on its website.

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The Communist Manifesto, the book explaining the political ideology responsible for the deaths of over 100 million in a single century, is advertised in paperback on the website.

Additionally, Bernie Sanders’ new book, Where We Go From Here: Two Years in the Resistance, is allowed to advertise on Amazon, as is Trevor Noah’s book of commentary on tweets by President Donald Trump. Ironically, in spite of Amazon supposedly forbidding political advertisements, both books are listed under Politics by the website.

Last month, I reported for Big League Politics that Amazon banned Covfefe Coffee’s advertisements for using the American flag:

Amazon considers use of the flag a violation of its rules against advocating political parties, candidates, or causes.

After speaking to Big League Politics, Covfefe Coffee provided several emails showing Amazon describe the American flag as “not appropriate for advertising,” with one Amazon employee adding that he does not “anticipate when these products will be eligible for advertising in the near future,” indicating that this is not a new or temporary policy for the online retail giant.

In a followup email, another Amazon employee specifically told Covfefe Coffee they would need to “remove the [American] flag from the product image” and remove the words “No Nonsense” and “No BS” from the advertisements.

Communicating with Big League Politics via email, Covfefe Coffee’s representatives expressed concern that Amazon is enforcing its policies against political advertisements arbitrarily to economically restrain conservatives.

On its website, Covfefe Coffee reveals that the brand supports the “‘Make America Great Again’ agenda,” and are willing to take the “revolutionary act” of publicly supporting President Trump.

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Twitter Posts Job Posting for Developing Paid Subscription Service; Will Platform Become Pay-to-Use?

Will it lead to the downfall of the platform?

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Shares for Twitter’s stock surged more than 8% on Wednesday as the company posted an online job listing for a developer who would work on a new system designed as a pay-to-use platform.

The job listing advertises the opening for a project team termed “Gryphon.” The company describes the team as creating a “subscription platform” that “can be reused by other teams in the future.”

In a statement to CNN on the job listing, Twitter underplayed the announcement, stating that it was only a job listing, not a product announcement.

We’re conducting this survey to assess the interest in a new, more enhanced version of Tweetdeck. We regularly conduct user research to gather feedback about people’s Twitter experience and to better inform our product investment decisions, and we’re exploring several ways to make Tweetdeck even more valuable for professionals.

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CEO Jack Dorsey has resisted shareholder demands to reorganize Twitter to prioritize profitability, most recently fending off a buyout attempt staged by oligarch Paul Singer challenging his leadership of the company. Dorsey kept his position of power over the company after reaching an agreement with profit-hungry shareholders, and the new development of paid subscription software could signal he intends to further satisfy them.

The company’s major investors will likely be pleased by any sign the company intends to convert its service into a pay-to-use model, evolving away from the tradition business model of micro-targeted ads towards its user base. However, a change to a subscription model could prove to be a threat to Twitter’s appeal, especially when newer free speech platforms are gunning for the platform’s user base and the company caves to the demands of censorious liberal journalists in suspending a variety of public figures deemed inconvenient to the neoliberal societal model.

Ultimately, the greed and thirst for power of the privileged elites of Silicon Valley could possibly bring about an end to their era of domination over online political speech, heralding a renaissance of the internet.

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