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BREAKING: Facebook Bans User Who Posted Audio Of CNN Producer Cold-Calling Kavanaugh Classmate

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UPDATE: Facebook re-instated Amy Dryden following publication of this article.

Facebook has decided to censor evidence that CNN producer Scott Bronstein is cold-calling Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s former classmates in a bid to dig up dirt on the President Trump pick.

Mark Zuckerberg’s platform has also decided to ban the user who posted the audio.

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“This is what happens when you post an actual recording of a CNN producer’s dirty journalism on Facebook. #banned So wrong!,” tweeted Amy Dryden, who posted the Bronstein clip on Facebook after a friend sent it to her.

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Dryden also made clear that the number Bronstein provided on the audiotape was not Bronstein’s personal number, writing:

“For critics saying FB banned me for leaving CNN producers tel # in his VM I posted…my friends he called have unpublished #. He found it, invading their privacy, and has been calling them all week. Tel # in video of VM I posted was a CNN tel #- NOT producers personal #.”

Facebook also censored our viral report on the audiotape, even though we carefully bleeped out the CNN phone number, which he left on his message for the random Kavanaugh classmate.

“Facebook took down the original post of this. It had nearly 150,000 views and 6,000+ shares. FB censoring conservatives again,” said Todd Schurk, linking to a Big League Politics report.

Here is our original report in full with the phone number bleeped out:

CNN producer Scott Bronstein is caught on tape calling around to Brett Kavanaugh’s Yale classmates from the class of ’87.

“Sender’s husband is a Yale grad and CNN is proactively contacting ‘87 Yale graduates who were in Pierson Residential College to try to dig up dirt on Kavanaugh,” Amy Dryden wrote on Facebook.

The media has now put forward two sexual impropriety accusers: Palo Alto-based left-wing activist professor Christine Blasey Ford, and former George Soros Open Society Foundations senior fellow Deborah Ramirez, also a professor. But so far no concrete evidence has implicated Kavanaugh in any wrongdoing.

Here is Bronstein’s call to one Yale graduate. Big League Politics deleted the number for Bronstein from the audiotape:

Free Speech

Texas Governor Greg Abbott Pledges to Outlaw Big Tech Censorship

Texas has had enough.

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Texas Governor Greg Abbott is pledging to outlaw Big Tech’s left-wing censorship, announcing his support of a bill in the Texas State Senate that would open social media monopolies to lawsuits from users at a state level.

State Senator Bryan Hughes Senate Bill 12 would provide legal recourse for users of Big Tech platforms who are banned from the services to return, designating Big Tech monopolies such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook as common carriers.

“They are common carriers and they cannot discriminate against people … it’s a violation of the first amendment,” Hughes said. “This is going to protect Texas’ free speech and get them back online.

These are the areas that used to be the courthouse square where people would come and talk,” said Abbott of the legislation. “Now, people are going to Facebook and Twitter to talk about their political ideas, and what Facebook and Twitter are doing — they are controlling the flow of information, and sometimes denying the flow of information.

Texas is taking a stand against big tech political censorship. We are not going to allow it in the Lone Star state.

The law establishing legal recourse against online censorship may prove legally durable enough to avoid breaching Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. That law provides immunity for user-created content on internet platforms, and doesn’t give social media platforms a right to discriminate against active or potential users on the basis of political ideology.

The future for fighting Big Tech censorship lies at a state level. While some state Republican officials have proven reluctant to separate themselves from the lucrative business lobbies of Big Tech oligarchs, Hughes’ approach seems legally innovative enough to give free speech defenders a fighting shot at free expression online.


Follow me on Gab @WildmanAZ, Twitter @Wildman_AZ, and on Parler @Moorhead.

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