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CONFIRMED: Mueller Team Can Be Disbarred For Clinton Conflicts In Trump Case

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A top national attorney in consultation with U.S. attorneys confirmed to Big League Politics that special counsel Robert Mueller and members of his team can be formally disbarred for waging the “Russia” case against President Donald Trump. Mueller and his associates have glaring conflicts of interest in the case concerning Trump.

Mueller’s team is tainted not only by partisan political donations and activities, but by direct relationships with former clients like Hillary Clinton, who is integrally involved in most of the possible evidence in this case. These conflicts clearly violate American Bar Association guidelines.

Hillary Clinton colluded with the Russians in selling them our uranium. Clinton handpicked Mueller to give a sample of uranium to the Russians, and Mueller subsequently flew to Moscow, according to publicly available documents.

Don Trump Jr.’s meeting at Trump Tower with a Russian lawyer, a showbiz manager and others — in which the adoption-related Magnitsky Act was discussed — is the only thing resembling evidence that the mainstream media has been able to find. But that meeting is tarred with Clinton connections. According to Wikileaks, a Hillary Clinton campaign spokesman said that “With the help of the research team we killed a Bloomberg story trying to link HRC’s opposition to the Magnitsky bill to a $500,000 speech that [Bill Clinton] gave in Moscow.” Radio host Andrew Wilkow said that Clinton took $500,000 from Sberbank, a Russian bank represented by the Podesta Group that also happens to be a client of Natalia Veselnitskaya’s law firm (Veselnitskaya is the Russian lawyer who met with Don Jr.).

Trending: Maxine Waters Wants Trump Supporters To Stop Confronting Her

Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta and the DNC accuse the Russians of hacking their emails, despite evidence to the contrary, which provides further Clinton involvement in the case and further conflicts for Mueller’s Clinton-linked team.

Mueller’s 13-member Dream Team is comprised of anti-Trump stalwarts including three Democratic Party donors, legal representatives for Hillary Clinton during her email scandal, and vociferous anti-Trump tweeter Preet Bharara, who was fired by Trump from his position as a U.S. Attorney within the Department of Justice. These conflicts of interests, especially pertaining to Clinton, make it necessary for some members of the team to recuse themselves. If they don’t, they can be disbarred.

The American Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Standards for the Prosecution Function make clear that Mueller’s team is in violation of standards, according to the top national attorney. Here are the relevant sections (emphasis added):

“A prosecutor should not use other improper considerations, such as partisan or political or personal considerations, in exercising prosecutorial discretion. A prosecutor should strive to eliminate implicit biases, and act to mitigate any improper bias or prejudice when credibly informed that it exists within the scope of the prosecutor’s authority.

(b)  A prosecutor’s office should be proactive in efforts to detect, investigate, and eliminate improper biases, with particular attention to historically persistent biases like race, in all of its work.  A prosecutor’s office should regularly assess the potential for biased or unfairly disparate impacts of its policies on communities within the prosecutor’s jurisdiction, and eliminate those impacts that cannot be properly justified.”

 “Standard 3-1.7           Conflicts of Interest

(a)  The prosecutor should know and abide by the ethical rules regarding conflicts of interest that apply in the jurisdiction, and be sensitive to facts that may raise conflict issues.  When a conflict requiring recusal exists and is non-waivable, or informed consent has not been obtained, the prosecutor should recuse from further participation in the matter. The office should not go forward until a non-conflicted prosecutor, or an adequate waiver, is in place…”

“(c)  The prosecutor should not participate in a matter in which the prosecutor previously participated, personally and substantially, as a non-prosecutor, unless the appropriate government office, and when necessary a former client, gives informed consent confirmed in writing.

(d)  The prosecutor should not be involved in the prosecution of a former client. A prosecutor who has formerly represented a client should not use information obtained from that representation to the disadvantage of the former client.”

“(f)  The prosecutor should not permit the prosecutor’s professional judgment or obligations to be affected by the prosecutor’s personal, political, financial, professional, business, property, or other interests or relationships.  A prosecutor should not allow interests in personal advancement or aggrandizement to affect judgments regarding what is in the best interests of justice in any case.”

“g)  The prosecutor should disclose to appropriate supervisory personnel any facts or interests that could reasonably be viewed as raising a potential conflict of interest.  If it is determined that the prosecutor should nevertheless continue to act in the matter, the prosecutor and supervisors should consider whether any disclosure to a court or defense counsel should be made, and make such disclosure if appropriate.”

“(j)  The prosecutor should promptly report to a supervisor all but the most obviously frivolous misconduct allegations made, publicly or privately, against the prosecutor.  If a supervisor or judge initially determines that an allegation is serious enough to warrant official investigation, reasonable measures, including possible recusal, should be instituted to ensure that the prosecution function is fairly and effectively carried out.  A mere allegation of misconduct is not a sufficient basis for prosecutorial recusal, and should not deter a prosecutor from attending to the prosecutor’s duties.”

The conflicts of interest are everywhere.

Peter Strzok, who oversaw the Hillary Clinton email investigation for the FBI and interviewed Hillary Clinton, is on Mueller’s team.

Clinton donor Jeannie Rhee, who represented the Clinton Foundation and also Hillary Clinton during the email investigation, is on Mueller’s team.

Aaron Zebley, who repped Clinton aide and key email-scandal figure Justin Cooper, is on Mueller’s team.

Andrew Weissmann defended the federal government’s surveillance rights in a panel discussion at the George Soros-funded New America Foundation, is also an Obama donor.

Preet Bharara, the man who prosecuted conservative writer Dinesh D’Souza and was a leading contender to be Hillary Clinton’s theoretical Attorney General, was fired by the Trump administration but still landed his office’s prosecutor Andrew Goldstein on Mueller’s team, presenting another conflict of interest that he seems to have no intention of hiding.

How about Mueller himself?

CIA and NSA whistleblower Dennis Montgomery identified former FBI director Mueller as having overseen a secret surveillance program that spied on Trump’s phone calls for years. The alleged program, created during the Bush administration and run by Obama intelligence officials John Brennan and James Clapper, is detailed on 47 hard drives that Montgomery and his lawyer turned over to the FBI, which James Comey buried. Montgomery is suing Obama, Brennan, Clapper and others in a case before D.C. District Court Judge Richard Leon. This case is being watched closely by insiders on both sides of the Russia probe.

Mueller also helped stonewall the Obama administration’s “investigation” of its own IRS targeting scandal.

As Big League Politics reported, Mueller has formed a political team with his friend, fired FBI director James Comey, and the current FBI director Andrew McCabe to work together against President Donald Trump. But Mueller and Comey are not the ringleaders. Surprisingly, it’s McCabe.

An inside source told Big League Politics that McCabe is “running the show,” and “he’s the key.”

“Mueller and McCabe are assembling a better political operation than Hillary had in the campaign. The trio of Mueller/McCabe and Comey are all creatures of the swamp,” the source explained. “Any Republican who thinks this isn’t a political operation and isn’t geared toward impacting 2018 and beyond is absolutely nuts.”

“I think McCabe is the most politically savvy given how he navigated the controversy with his wife’s campaign donations and the Clinton investigation,” the source continued.

McCabe took over when Comey got fired and quickly set up the team’s power play. McCabe said that Comey did not get fired from the FBI for performance issues. That sets up the premise for a potential obstruction of justice move by the McCabe-Mueller-Comey trio.

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White House

WINNING: How President Trump’s ‘Cheese In The Maze’ Strategy Worked

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About a year ago I noticed Donald Trump had developed an amazing strategy to keep the fake news media totally engrossed on meaningless stories while he did “real work” assembling his administration, getting the economy roaring, and feeling out his enemies. I called this “cheese in the maze.” It included everything from stories about feuds between various members of the administration to odd tweets from Trump himself that seemed to have nothing to do with his agenda.

It dawned on me this was all by design. Newt Gingrich had said of the media, “they are going to chase a rabbit, so you might as well give them a rabbit to chase.” And he did.

For month after month, the fake newsies pursued the most astonishing array of stories that all seemingly had one endpoint—showing that Trump’s team was in “chaos” or “collapsing” or “fighting among themselves.” Trump loved it. Even if there was genuine chaos, he is a master of navigating through waters where only he knows where he’s going. But for the most part, Trump’s “cheese” kept the fake news media rats chasing a plethora of leads from “sources” that came from the White House itself, most often deliberately.

That was not to say everything was perfectly smooth or harmonious in Trump’s White House. After all, he brought in fairly high level (and high-ego) people, including H. R. McMaster, Steve Bannon, and Rex Tillerson. It was inevitable that after a while, some, or all, of these personalities would be gone. And so they were.

But by late 2017, a different pattern began developing. As Trump stabilized his administration, purged the leakers and GOPe loyalists, and remade the government in his own image, the stories more or less stopped. Instead what took over was . . .

WINNING.

Trump’s policies took on a life of their own—almost all as he had predicted—and suddenly the economy was booming, judges were getting confirmed, enemies were coming to the negotiating table, and taxes were being cut. Although the fake news media often tried to avoid covering these stories, the fact was Trump no longer needed to generate anything for the rabbits to chase. Instead, the news cycle began to be filled with Trump news (in reality, Trump friendly news, even though the fake news media attempted to spin it differently).

So take the past week. Trump did two rallies, the Supreme Court handed him four victories, Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement . . . and it’s only Wednesday! Trump’s activities and his constant stream of winning have replaced the “cheese,” feeding off their own momentum. During the campaign, Trump promised “You’ll get tired of winning.” it seems as though the Trump news that his supporters would see as positive is now falling like rain. On a single day, the Supreme Court gave him a major victory in the Janus labor union case, Justice Kennedy announced his retirement—whereupon Mitch McConnell announced that he would ensure Trump’s nominee to replace Kennedy would be confirmed—and Trump held a rally in North Dakota.

In. One. Day!

But there is something else largely hidden at work. Trump has gone from making seemingly disconnected tweets to making short announcements that, once again, the fake news media pays little attention to. These announcements are viewed as off the cuff remarks, such as when Trump announced he was planning to reform and reorganize government, or rebuild the nation’s space capability. Then, virtually nothing is said about the subject of that announcement for weeks, even months. Suddenly, seemingly out of nowhere, Mick Mulvaney emerges with a full-blown plan to . . . reorganize government. This has now become an almost reverse “cheese in the maze.” Trump is quite openly telling everyone what he plans to do, but the fake news media ignores him until it appears months later as a fully developed policy.

This was largely the story of the tax cut bill. Be honest: How many had heard most of the details of the tax bill even one week out from it being voted on? Trump has said in a comment largely ignored that we would send a manned mission to Mars. You can bet someone in NASA is working that plan right now. “Cheese in the maze” is a thing of the past. Today’s news is winning. And more winning.

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