Connect with us

News

Congresswoman Donna Shalala Reveals that She Did Not Disclose Stock Sales After Pelosi Appointed Her to Preside Over Multi-Billion $ Bailouts

Published

on

Congresswoman Donna Shalala openly admitted that she did not disclose at least 6 stock sales that were made following her election to the U.S. house in 2018 according to a Zerohedge report.

The sales were curiously discussed after Nancy Pelosi appointed Shalala to a committee presiding over hundreds of billions of dollars of bailout money being doled out to corporations via the Wuhan virus relief bill, according to a report from Axios.

Shalala sold some of her stocks in Boeing, Alaska Airlines, Chevron, Conoco, and AMC after winning her congressional race in 2018.

Trending: Nebraska Small Business Owner Commits Suicide After Being Railroaded With Manslaughter For Defending His Bar From Criminal Rioters

She defended her actions by saying that she made the sales in order to avoid conflicts of interest. However, she did not report the stock sales within 45 days as mandated by the STOCK act. “I did file my disclosure report, so everybody knew what my holdings are. They didn’t know I was unloading the entire portfolio so I could put everything into mutual [funds] basically to avoid any conflict of interest,” she stated, according to The Hill.

take our poll - story continues below

Did Kyle Rittenhouse act in self defense?

  • VOTE NOW: Did Kyle Rittenhouse act in self defense when he shot three BLM rioters? 

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Big League Politics updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Her spokesperson, Carlos Condarco, previously stated that Shalala was not acquainted with the rules. “She had a misunderstanding about the periodic transaction report process and her need to report the sale of these stocks while preparing a blind trust. As a new member with a broker and attorney who were not familiar with the congressional disclosure rules, there was a misunderstanding.”

However, Shalala contradicted her spokesman’s statement:

Look, I knew what the law was. I missed the deadlines.

She added:

 It was my mistake and I take full responsibility. I missed the deadlines. And I have to take responsibility, personal responsibility for doing that. No one else is responsible except for me.

In terms of punishment, Shalala said that she is receptive to whatever is appropriate: “Whatever they think is appropriate. Whether it’s a financial penalty or anything else. I’m really sorry I missed those deadlines in the process of trying to do the right thing.”

Politicians have lately come under fire for selling stocks after attending a private congressional briefing on the Wuhan virus. Georgia Senator Kelly Loeffler was the most notable of these figures who bought and sold roughly $1.4 million in stock right before the market crashed.

According to the Wall Street Journal:

Ms. Loeffler reported that she and her husband bought about $590,000 of stock and sold about $845,000 of stock from Feb. 18 through March 13. If they had held the shares they sold through Monday, the stock would have been valued at $86,000 less than what they sold it for, according to the Journal analysis.

If Congress wants to make wealth transfers more accountable, it needs to completely prohibit elected officials who have sensitive stocks from presiding over bailout commissions.

Better yet, Congress should not be bailing out any companies and let them fail instead.

News

Southern Baptist Convention Reverses Course on Name Change After BLP Reporting

They say they’re not changing their name.

Published

on

The Southern Baptist Convention has sought to dispel reporting from Big League Politics on the organization’s planned name change, arguing that the institution isn’t formally changing its name.

take our poll - story continues below

Did Kyle Rittenhouse act in self defense?

  • VOTE NOW: Did Kyle Rittenhouse act in self defense when he shot three BLM rioters? 

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Big League Politics updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

But a close look at the American Christian church’s plans relating to its name reveal that it’s played with the idea far more seriously than they’re making it seem.

Reports of a name change first emerged in a Washington Post article published on Tuesday. SBC President JD Greear told the Post that “hundreds of churches” affiliated with the denomination had “committed” to using the phrase “Great Commission Baptist” as an alternative to the denomination’s longtime moniker. The change would come as Greear touts his support of the Black Lives Matter, although he’s been careful in pointing out he doesn’t support any formal organization related to the movement. Greear also is renaming the church he personally pastors with the term.

The SBC’s 2021 convention will also organize under the motto of “We Are Great Commission Baptists.” Sounds a lot like a name change, even if the SBC’s leadership is steadfastly maintaining it isn’t.

The name ‘Great Commission Baptist’ is theologically sound in the Christian religion, but it’s somewhat questionable that the organization’s leader appears to be emphasizing it at a moment in which political correctness is making its entryism into many Christian churches and organizations.

It seems as if the organization’s figurehead is keen to present himself as a liberal-style suburban Evangelical to the Washington Post, but he changed his tune quite quickly when the rank and file membership of Southern Baptist churches learned that he was promoting the idea of a name change.

Continue Reading
It's time to name Antifa a terror org! Sign your petition now!


Trending