Connect with us

The Swamp

COURT DOCUMENTS: Sherrod Brown’s Ex-Wife Accused Him of Assaulting Her

Published

on

Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown, who is up for re-election in 2018, was accused by his ex-wife of “assault.” Brown’s ex-wife claims that Brown threw her up against a wall and showed “physical violence and abusive nature.”

As I reported:

“Court documents show that Brown was accused of assaulting his ex-wife Larke Ummel Brown and acting cruelly toward her and the couple’s two small children.

Trending: Ex-Soviet Leader Gorbachev: US Capitol Riot “Planned in Advance, And It Is Clear by Whom”

Larke Brown lobbed damaging accusations against Sherrod, then the Ohio Secretary of State, in her 1986 complaint for divorce:

take our poll - story continues below

Did Kyle Rittenhouse act in self defense?

  • VOTE NOW: Did Kyle Rittenhouse act in self defense when he shot three BLM rioters? 

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Big League Politics updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

“Plaintiff further states that Defendant has been guilty of gross neglect of duty and extreme cruelty toward her, by reason of which Plaintiff is entitled to an absolute divorce.”

“I am also intimidated by the Defendant and am in fear for the safety and well-being of myself and our children due to the Defendant’s physical violence and abusive nature,” Larke Brown wrote in her affidavit requesting a restraining order, dated May 12, 1986.

A judge in the Court of Common Pleas of Franklin County, Ohio, granted Larke Brown a restraining order from the future senator, according to a document dated May 12, 1986.

Sherrod Brown disputed his wife’s claims, saying in his counterclaim for divorce, dated June 10, 1986, that he “has never been abusive or violent with Wife or anyone else.”

The seven-count restraining order barred Sherrod Brown from harassing Larke in person or over the phone, selling or disposing of the couple’s assets, changing beneficiaries or cashing out life insurance policies on Larke or their children, and from “coming in or around the Plaintiff’s residence … except for purposes of visitation with the parties’ minor children.”

Larke claimed that Brown violated the restraining order when he visited her residence to pick up their children, according to an October 1986 affidavit:

“[Brown] refused to return to the car, pushed me up against the wall with his arms in order to pass and entered the house. He refused to leave and began to say insulting, derogatory things about me, my mothering of the children and my character in front of my friends and the children … [Brown] then cornered one of my friends … and again started on his tirade of character assassination. … [I] felt physically threatened because of [Brown’s] combative tone and his assault on [me] at the entrance to the house.”

Larke’s affidavit continues:

“He has struck and bullied me on several different occasions, he has completely destroyed my peace of mind and I am extremely intimidated by him … [Brown] has embarked on a course of conduct designed to destroy the children’s peace of mind by making slanderous and defamatory remarks about [me] to them, as well as insisting that they repeat untruthful things that [Brown] had coached them to state.”

The restraining order was dropped in January 1987 when the two parties agreed to settle the divorce, according to court documents.”

 

The Swamp

Dan Crenshaw White Knights for Liz Cheney After Republicans Blast Her Support for Trump’s Second Impeachment

Birds of a feather flock together.

Published

on

Liz Cheney, daughter of Dick, was one of ten GOP House members to vote “yes” on President Donald Trump’s unprecedented second impeachment. Then when some were calling on Cheney to resign over her disgraceful vote, Dan Crenshaw, who voted against impeachment, quickly came to her defense and announced his “full support” for her.

“Let’s get some truth on the record: @Liz_Cheney has a hell of a lot more backbone than most, & is a principled leader with a fierce intellect,” Crenshaw tweeted Wednesday afternoon. “She will continue to be a much needed leader in the conference, with my full support.”

“We can disagree without tearing each other apart,” he added.

Crenshaw himself was then roundly criticized in the replies to his tweet.

Cheney’s vote comes as no surprise. Big League Politics reported on her recent statement in support of Trump’s second impeachment, part of which read: “There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution. I will vote to impeach the President.” For this CNN laughably called her the “conscience of Republicans.”

Read More: No, Liz Cheney is Not the Future of the GOP

As the old saying goes, “birds of a feather flock together.” Dan Crenshaw and Liz Cheney most certainly do not represent the future of the GOP.

Continue Reading
It's time to name Antifa a terror org! Sign your petition now!


Trending