Deputies Vote ‘No Confidence’ On Sheriff Scott Israel

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel has suffered an official “no confidence” vote from the union representing Broward County deputies.

Israel, whose team stood outside the Parkland high school on Valentine’s Day and allowed the shooting to happen, is still in office, despite the vast revelations of incompetence and willful neglect that led to the horrific school shooting.

Scott Israel is defiant, calling the union vote “inconsequential” and motivated by salary concerns.

Trending: EXCLUSIVE: James Comey’s Leaker Friend – Guess Who His Neighbor Is?

The Sun-Sentinel reports: 

“Deputies are confident that Florida governor Rick Scott will now have to fire Scott Israel, especially when learning about his office’s appropriation of taxpayer money. Scott has called for FBI director Christopher Wray to resign due to the Bureau looking the other way on known school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz. Scott might now choose to fire Scott Israel.

Jeff Bell, the president of the Broward Sheriff’s Office Deputies Association, said the union’s “members have displayed great courage to come out and vote under threat of retaliation and reprisal from the sheriff

Bell said he phoned the sheriff, but could not reach him, instead leaving a voice message. He said the plan is to present the union’s vote to Gov. Rick Scott and ask him to “please make change and replace the sheriff with somebody who is capable of amazing leadership.”
Bell added, “Amazing leadership starts from the top, and there is no amazing leadership here. We are a ship out at sea with no power — adrift.”

The sheriff released a statement after the vote results were released.

“I am accountable to the citizens of Broward County,” the sheriff said. “My job is to continue to do the job I was elected to do, which is to ensure the safety of Broward County’s 1.9 million residents. I will not be distracted from my duties by this inconsequential IUPA union vote, which was designed to extort a 6.5 percent pay raise from this agency. Those who purportedly voted in this straw ballot reflect only a small number of the 5,400 employees. The unions representing the vast majority of our employees solidly support the leadership of this agency.'”

Sun-Sentinel passage ends

Scott Israel’s problems are vast.

Big League Politics reported:

Sheriff Scott Israel’s Broward County Sheriff’s Office made a concerted effort to not enter the Parkland high school during February’s mass shooting, instead allowing the shooting to happen.

The mainstream media is finally reporting on police and emergency scanner audio tapes that show the full extent of the Sheriff’s Office’s complicity in the horror at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

“Do not approach the 12 or 1300 building, stay at least 500 feet away,” Sheriff’s Office deputy Scot Peterson said over radio dispatch, disproving his claim that he didn’t go inside the school because he was ordered not to do so if he didn’t have body cameras on. School surveillance footage has still not been released, and is unlikely to ever be released.

Big League Politics first reported on audiotapes showing that the Sheriff’s Office set up a perimeter around the high school during the shooting, after learning that multiple people were shot dead inside the high school. The police dispatcher ordered police to “hold all perimeters” while the shooter was still at large. Thirty minutes after learning of the active shooter situation, the Sheriff’s Office was still holding its perimeter and dispatchers were reporting “The shooter is not down. The shooter is not down.”

Our reporting proved that Israel’s office lied by claiming that they only set up a perimeter around the school AFTER the shooting, not during the shooting. In fact, they set up a perimeter four minutes after learning that people were shot dead inside.

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.