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DUMPING GROUNDS: Federal Judge Blocks Trump Plan to Let States Like Texas Block Refugees

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Ann Corcoran of Refugee Resettlement Watch reported on U.S. District Judge Peter Messitte’s recent ruling to keep the Trump administration from reforming its refugee program.

Three faith-based national resettlement agencies — HIAS Inc., Church World Service Inc., and Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service— requested that Messite issue the preliminary injunction.

Mark Hetfield, the CEO of HIA said that it is “unkind and un-American to ban refugees from your states and towns” in response to Trump issuing an executive order that gives states a say in whether they will accept refugees or not. He celebrated Messitte’s ruling.

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Back in September Trump issued the executive order declaring that the federal government would only resettle refugees if states and local governments had agreed to do so. This move gave states de facto veto power over whether they would resettle refugees. The government is looking to appeal the injunction order.

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“State and local governments are best positioned to know the resources and capacities they may or may not have available to devote to sustainable resettlement, which maximizes the likelihood refugees placed in the area will become self-sufficient and free from long-term dependence on public assistance,” the order declared.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott recently announced that Texas would lead the way in opting out of refugee resettlement. He stated that “Texas has carried more than its share in assisting the refugee resettlement process” and that it “continues to have to deal with the consequences of an immigration system that Congress has failed to fix.”

However, opponents of this order believe it is illegal and unconstitutional. Additionally, they contend that it would ruin the refugee program and have “disastrous consequences not only for Plaintiffs and eligible refugees but for the image of the United States as a beacon of liberty,” according to language in the ruling.

On the other hand, the Trump administration believes the order is lawful and sustains that because the president has the power to determine how many refugees will be resettled he also has the ability to mandate whether states have the authority to decide whether they want them or not.

Trump announced that the U.S. would bring in only 18,000 refugees for the fiscal year of 2020. This is a significant reduction from the limit of 110,000 former President Barack Obama set back in 2016

Corcoran had choice words for contractors who are promoting refugee resettlement. She believes that nine contractors, specifically, “are the heart of America’s Open Borders movement and thus there can never be long-lasting reform of US immigration policy when these nine un-elected phony non-profits are paid by the taxpayers to work as community organizers pushing an open borders agenda.”

She listed the following nine contractors as the main culprits behind the recent refugee resettlement mania:

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Southern Baptist Convention Reverses Course on Name Change After BLP Reporting

They say they’re not changing their name.

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The Southern Baptist Convention has sought to dispel reporting from Big League Politics on the organization’s planned name change, arguing that the institution isn’t formally changing its name.

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But a close look at the American Christian church’s plans relating to its name reveal that it’s played with the idea far more seriously than they’re making it seem.

Reports of a name change first emerged in a Washington Post article published on Tuesday. SBC President JD Greear told the Post that “hundreds of churches” affiliated with the denomination had “committed” to using the phrase “Great Commission Baptist” as an alternative to the denomination’s longtime moniker. The change would come as Greear touts his support of the Black Lives Matter, although he’s been careful in pointing out he doesn’t support any formal organization related to the movement. Greear also is renaming the church he personally pastors with the term.

The SBC’s 2021 convention will also organize under the motto of “We Are Great Commission Baptists.” Sounds a lot like a name change, even if the SBC’s leadership is steadfastly maintaining it isn’t.

The name ‘Great Commission Baptist’ is theologically sound in the Christian religion, but it’s somewhat questionable that the organization’s leader appears to be emphasizing it at a moment in which political correctness is making its entryism into many Christian churches and organizations.

It seems as if the organization’s figurehead is keen to present himself as a liberal-style suburban Evangelical to the Washington Post, but he changed his tune quite quickly when the rank and file membership of Southern Baptist churches learned that he was promoting the idea of a name change.

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