Connect with us

News

Elitist Harvard Professor Believes Anti-Lockdown Protests are the Consequence of Christian “Malignant Delusion”

Published

on

Harvard professor Steven Pinker criticized Evangelical Christianity for its alleged role in sparking anti-lockdown protests.

Pinker originally posted a tweet supporting a theory that came from an opinion piece in the Washington Post which attacked Evangelical Christians.

“Belief in an afterlife is a malignant delusion, since it devalues actual lives and discourages action that would make them longer, safer, and happier. Exhibit A: What’s really behind Republicans wanting a swift reopening? Evangelicals,” he originally tweeted.

Trending: Deranged Democrat Demands Prosecution of 40,000 Trump Supporters Who Were OUTSIDE Capitol

Pinker’s subsequently deleted the post after considerable backlash. The article that Pinker shared was originally authored by Gary Abernathy. In it, Abernathy claimed that the anti-lockdown protests were spurred not just by support for President Donald Trump, but also a strong focus on the afterlife which allegedly made Christians not care much about the virus.

take our poll - story continues below

POLL: Would you vote for Donald Trump in 2024?

  • POLL: Would you vote for Donald Trump in 2024? 

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Big League Politics updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

The article highlighted the following:

Christian fundamentalism is often fatalistic. As far as many evangelicals are concerned, life passes quickly, suffering is temporary, and worrying solves nothing. That’s not a view that comports well with long stretches of earthly time spent waiting out business closures or stay-at-home orders. It should be no surprise that a person’s deepest beliefs about the world influence how they measure the risks they’re willing to take.

Abernathy reached the following conclusion:

When ruminating over why there are millions of people who don’t seem to panic over a global pandemic or other life-threatening event, critics should remember that right or wrong, it often involves a belief in something even bigger than people named Trump, Hannity or Limbaugh.

Pinker’s tweeted received tremendous backlash from conservative commentators such as Dinesh D’Souza.

He tweeted:

Christopher Hitchens once described this pompous Harvard pedant as ‘educated beyond his intelligence.’ Pinker here proves Hitchens right. People want to get back to their jobs, their friends, their life, but Pinker insists their real motive is ‘belief in an afterlife.’

Pinker is a detached elite who has the luxury of having a cushy position at one of the country’s most prestigious institutions.

For him, the struggle of the middle class is foreign.

And like most elites, he can’t handle push back.

So it’s only natural that he delete his post after so much criticism.

Campaign 2020

The American Right Should Beware of Campaign Consultant Grifters

Some people want to make a quick buck with zero results to show for it.

Published

on

Heading into 2022 and 2024, America First operatives should be careful dealing with campaigns run by grifters. 

Patrick Clerbune of VDARE put out an informative post that serves as a warning to all about the rampant corruption within Republican political consultant outfits. 

He highlighted a Washington Post piece detailing how donors gave more than $8 million to Kim Klacik, a black woman running as a Republican candidate in Maryland’s 7th district. In reality, the money donated to Klacik’s campaign went straight to the fat pockets of political consultants who knew full well that she couldn’t win.

The Post went into further detail about this naked grifting opportunity:

take our poll - story continues below

POLL: Would you vote for Donald Trump in 2024?

  • POLL: Would you vote for Donald Trump in 2024? 

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Big League Politics updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Her campaign is an example of how some consulting firms are profiting handsomely from Republican candidates who have robust appeal in today’s politically charged environment…

By the end of Klacik’s campaign, she would raise a staggering $8.3 million and pay nearly $3.7 million of it to Olympic Media, according to campaign finance filings.

For political veterans, this is nothing new under the sun. Political consultant parasites such as Karl Rove are notorious for enriching themselves by running failed campaigns and diverting resources from actual winnable races. Rove was also involved in the Georgia Senate dumpster fire, where the GOP dropped a whopping $1 billion and still ended up losing both seats. 

Pointing out how the managerial state is detrimental to all Americans, especially minorities, is one thing. But using failed ethnic pandering and running campaigns in districts that can never be won by Republicans is another. 

In the aforementioned case, Maryland’s 7th district has never gone Republican in its history and was the long-time home of Elijah Cummings from 1996 until his death in 2019. Democrat challenger Kweisi Mfume completely obliterated Klacik 74 to 25 in the 2020 general election. 

Intelligent nationalists would be wise to recognize that certain races are lost causes, which drain resources that could otherwise be allocated towards winnable campaigns. A large degree of skepticism should always be directed towards the political consultant class. Their money-making model does not always translate into electoral success.

Continue Reading
It's time to name Antifa a terror org! Sign your petition now!


Trending