Founder of ‘1619 Project’ Reveals Genocidal Ideology: ‘White Race’ are ‘Barbaric Devils…Like Hitler’

Nikole Hannah-Jones, leader of the New York Times‘ 1619 Project, has a history of making extremely racist comments about white people.

In 1995, she wrote to Notre Dame’s The Observer that “the white race is the biggest murderer, rapist, pillager, and thief of the modern world” in a letter to the editor published by the paper.

Hannah-Jones made clear her racist hatred of America and its rich history in her screed titled, “Modern Savagery.” She called the European settlers and explorers responsible for the “acts of devils” for bringing civilization to the continent.

“[The whites] lasting monument was the destruction and enslavement of two races of people,” Hannah-Jones wrote.

She made the claims, not backed up by evidence, that Africans came to the Americans before white settlers and made peace with the Indians. She also stated that pyramids built in Mexico were built as a symbol of friendship and goodwill between the indigenous peoples and the Africans.

Hannah-Jones also placed the blame of all social problems in her community squarely on white people, spewing various conspiracy theories of dubious merit.

“The descendants of these savage people pump drugs and guns into the Black community, pack Black people into the squalor of segregated urban ghettos and continue to be bloodsuckers in our community,” she wrote.

“But after everything that those barbaric devils did, I do not hate them,” Hannah-Jones concluded. “I understand that because of some lacking, they needed to [sic] constantly prove their superiority.”

Hannah-Jones received a Pulitzer Prize earlier this year for her 1619 Project despite the fact that many historians have pointed out the numerous falsehoods and inaccuracies associated with the project:

The reviews of the 1619 Project are in.

It is “a very unbalanced, one-sided account.” It is “wrong in so many ways.” It is “not only ahistorical,” but “actually anti-historical.” It is “a tendentious and partial reading of American history.”

This is what top historians have said of the splashy New York Times feature on slavery in the U.S. that aspires to fundamentally reorient our understanding of American history and change what students are taught in the schools.

Given that the Times can’t necessarily be trusted to give a straight account in its news pages of Mitch McConnell’s latest tactical maneuver, it wouldn’t seem a natural source for objective truth on sensitive historical matters, and sure enough, the 1619 Project is shot through with an ideological radicalism that leads to rank distortions and laughable overreach.

The project has been controversial since it was first published in The New York Times Magazine last year, but its architects sneered at the critics as troglodyte conservatives (or “white historians”) unwilling to grapple with the country’s racial sins. Then the World Socialist Web Site — of all things — begin publishing interviews with eminent historians slamming the project…

At the end of the year, the Times published an extraordinary letter from McPherson, Oakes, and Wood, as well as Sean Wilentz of Princeton and Victoria Bynum of Texas State University, demanding “prominent corrections of all the errors and distortions presented in the 1619 Project.”

“These errors, which concern major events, cannot be described as interpretation or ‘framing,’” the historians wrote. “They are matters of verifiable fact, which are the foundation of both honest scholarship and honest journalism. They suggest a displacement of historical understanding by ideology. Dismissal of objections on racial grounds — that they are the objections of only ‘white historians’ — has affirmed that displacement.

Black Lives Matter (BLM) rioters are using the 1619 Project as the pseudo-history to justify their violent uprising. Hannah-Jones should be treated as an enemy combatant for her work in inspiring terrorism across the U.S.

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