George Soros: There Is Not ‘Much Difference’ Between Romney and Obama

George Soros Flickr Creative Commons http://bit.ly/2wfj4By Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung

Progressive billionaire George Soros said in 2012 that there is not much tangible difference between presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Barack Obama.

Romney announced Friday his campaign for U.S. Senate in Utah, after having previously served one term as governor of Massachusetts. The Mormon establishmentarian is an early favorite to pick up the GOP nomination at the state party’s insider-driven convention, but Trump supporters are not happy about it. Romney’s constant opposition to Trump — including his failed attempts to sink Trump during the election in favor of Hillary Clinton — must eventually come back to haunt him.

Trump adviser Roger Stone believes, based on his sources, that Romney is only running for Senate in 2018 to set himself up for a presidential primary challenge to Trump in 2020.

Soros, who wants to fundamentally change American society in accordance with his totalitarian socialist vision, had no problem with Romney in 2012 — as Romney’s primary opponent Newt Gingrich often pointed out.

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“If it’s between Obama and Romney, there isn’t all that much difference except for the crowd that they bring with them,” Soros said in an interview with Reuters at the Davos conference.

“So it won’t be that great a difference and I think there won’t be a great deal of enthusiasm on either side of the battleground. It will be more civilised than the previous elections have been,” Soros stated.

Romney was viciously mocked during his losing presidential campaign for being out-of-touch with American voters.

 

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