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Lebron’s $2 Million ‘Investment’ in a School Will Cost Taxpayers $80,000,000 Over 10 Years

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The mainstream press recently made Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James into a God-like figure for “building a school” for at-risk youth in Akron, OH.

“‘I Promise’ will eventually cost about $8 million a year to run out of the district’s regular budget, covered mostly by shifting students, teachers and money from other schools, the district says,” according to Cleveland.com.

“I Promise” is the name of “James'” school.

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This is not to knock James, who is donating $2 million to the fund the school, and without whom the “school would have never happened,” according to district Treasurer Ryan Pendleton.

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Rather, this is about the press, who left out the minor detail that over the course of the school’s existence, a majority of the bill will be footed by Akron taxpayers.

According to Cleveland.com: 

I Promise is a district school. It’s not a private school or even a charter school, a form of public schools that are funded with tax dollars but are privately-run.

Though James will have a huge influence on the school, I Promise will be run by the district. It’s a district-owned building. The district will hire and pay the teachers and administration. Kids will ride district buses to school. And they will all eat the free breakfast and lunch the district gives all students.

I Promise will eventually cost about $8 million a year to run out of the district’s regular budget, covered mostly by shifting students, teachers and money from other schools, the district says.

“He did a lot, but taxpayers should know it’s their investment too,” said district spokesman Mark Williamson. “The coverage made it look like the whole thing is his.”

Now why would the media do that?

Likely because James has an ongoing feud with the right-wing media, including Fox News’ Laura Ingraham, who infamously told him to “shut up and dribble” on her nightly program, and President Donald J. Trump, who bashed James and CNN host Don Lemon on Twitter.

“Lebron James was just interviewed by the dumbest man on television, Don Lemon. He made Lebron look smart, which isn’t easy to do. I like Mike!” Trump wrote.

The attack was immediately deemed “racist,” though Trump said “I like Mike” in a reference to Michael Jordan.

The leftist-dominated mainstream press is conniving. They understand that politics is downstream from culture. By vilifying Trump, which they do on a daily basis, and elevating James, they win political capital for Democrats, which is their intended goal.

That is why they failed to report that most of “James'” new school will be funded by the taxpayer, like every other poorly-run inner-city public school in America.

 

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Conservative-Friendly Sports Writer Jason Whitlock: First Woman to Play in Power Five College Football Game a “Make-A-Wish” Publicity Stunt

The voice of reason.

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Jason Whitlock, a former ESPN and Fox Sports writer and current OutKick columnist, did not hold back in his criticism of the Sarah Fuller publicity stunt and the subsequent reaction that called her a “hero” and a “trailblazer.”

Sarah Fuller is a goalie for the Vanderbilt University women’s soccer team. But Vanderbilt’s football team, already having a dreadful enough of a season as it is, at one point did not have a kicker going into Saturday’s contest against Missouri—because of, you guessed it, COVID-19. So they turned to Fuller and added her to the roster, thus making her the first woman to ever play in a Power Five college football game. (Power Five refers to the sport’s five major conferences: the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, and SEC. Vanderbilt is an SEC team.)

Her only appearance in the game—which Vanderbilt lost 41-0—featured her squib kicking the ball to Missouri’s 37-yard line at the beginning of the second half and dashing to the sideline. That’s it.

So it was only a matter of time before Whitlock, who does not describe himself as conservative but is clearly conservative-friendly, bashed the virtue-signaling surrounding Fuller’s appearance.

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“Sarah Fuller briefly made football socially acceptable for America’s most ardent virtue-signalers. That was her primary accomplishment, pleasing Make A Wish America,” Whitlock wrote. “I don’t believe she played football. She scored a point in the culture war.”

Whitlock acknowledges that Fuller is an elite athlete, given that she plays goalie for a Division 1 soccer team which just won its conference championship last week and is heading for the NCAA Tournament in the spring, but says that putting her in this situation only diminishes female athletes.

“I don’t blame Sarah Fuller. She’s an accomplished, high-level Division 1 athlete. She’s a soccer goalie for the Vanderbilt women’s soccer team. She’s been baited into believing competing against men is her North star. Maybe it is. It shouldn’t be,” he wrote.

He added: “Sarah Fuller is an elite soccer player. She’s a terrible football player, arguably the worst to ever take the field in the SEC. The announcers during the game said [Vanderbilt head coach Derek Mason] wasn’t comfortable using her [to] kick field goals unless they were inside the 15-yard line. There were pictures of her warming up in pregame kicking 14-yard field goals. Her athleticism does not need to be validated by competing against men in any capacity, let alone in a sport that is not her specialty.”

Whitlock also attacked “culture warriors” for hailing Fuller as “Jackie Robinson 2.0” and spending tons of money to prop up women as the athletic equals of men.

“There’s a lot of money being spent to create the illusion that women can and should be playing football against men. The people spending the money hate football. It epitomizes ‘toxic masculinity’… except when women are on the field. Football should also be shuttered because of the head trauma dangers… unless women are playing. Oh, and during this COVID pandemic, it’s irresponsible for these Power 5 schools to exploit these college athletes… unless there’s a woman playing.”

Read Whitlock’s entire op-ed here. Thank God the sports writing world has at least one voice who can speak the truth like this. As someone who used to write about sports myself, I’m well aware that there are far too few Whitlocks in the profession.

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