Mexican President Admits that He Released the Son of Chapo Guzmán

The president of Mexico Andrés Manuel López Obrador revealed on June 19, 2020 that he personally requested the release of one of the sons of notorious drug kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzmán, following his short capture during a military operation.

The Guardian reported that “Scenes of mayhem during the operation caused López Obrador’s government considerable embarrassment in October as security forces briefly captured Ovidio Guzmán only to let him go hours later as the security forces were overwhelmed by cartel forces.”

During this incident back in October, armed gunmen from the Sinaloa cartel quickly rushed into Culiacán. A siege then popped off as cartel gunmen set up flaming roadblocks and started opening fire in the streets as a means of trying to liberate the drug lord’s Guzmán.

The failed arrest and the resulting chaos raised speculation about the government simply capitulating to drug cartels, and brought up doubts about the president’s plan to revamp Mexico’s public security strategy.

Previously, López Obrador revealed that his security cabinet made the decision to release Ovidio, a decision that he supported to protect residents from the crossfire between cartel henchmen and security forces.

June 19 was the first time the president openly acknowledged that he issued the order himself.

“So as not to put the population at risk … I ordered that this operation be stopped and that this alleged criminal be released,” López Obrador said during a news conference.

López Obrador also noted that a few days after President Donald Trump offered to lay the smack down on the cartel, but Mexico did not accept the American president’s offer.

The U.S. government continues to seek Ovidio’s extradition.

Despite López Obrador’s pledge to craft tighter security policies, Mexico continues to set all-time records when it comes to violence.

In light of this reality of a veritable failed state across our border, the U.S. needs to make border security its #1 priority.