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New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio Seeks to Bring City Back From Coronavirus with Interpretive Dance Sessions on the Street

Someone call the cringe department.

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Do you remember when New York City used to be cool?

Mayor Bill de Blasio is seeking to restore the diminished city by staging cultural events that include bizarre interpretive dance sessions on city streets. The Mayor spoke about a city plan to bring back New York City’s cultural life with a series of street performances.

Meanwhile, some performers engaged in a bizarre interpretive dance session.

De Blasio was assailed for the weak destruction as the once-legendary city collapses, incurring the worst outbreak of the Chinese coronavirus in the entire world. Hundreds of thousands of residents have left the city, citing declining quality of life, tolerance for crime, high taxes, riots, and anarcho-tyranny.

The Open Culture program De Blasio is creating will designate 115 street areas for artists to practice their craft. Unfortunately, with levels of violent crime unseen in the city for decades, it’s unlikely that creative talent with more talent than the typical 30-second commercial will practice their craft in the beleaguered city.

Wildlife enthusiast and MMA podcaster Joe Rogan expressed his surprise with the glib dance party, questioning why De Blasio wants to fund interpretive dance sessions as New Yorkers continue to die from the coronavirus.

Sadly, the era of New York City being a global leader in multiple genres of music, film, and art may be a thing of the past. The essence of the city’s creative expression will conceivably be spent on diversity trainings and critical race theory for the foreseeable future, with freedom of thought to create new forms of free expression deemed “problematic.”


Follow me on Gab @WildmanAZ, Twitter @Wildman_AZ, and on Parler @Moorhead.

Free Speech

Texas Governor Greg Abbott Pledges to Outlaw Big Tech Censorship

Texas has had enough.

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Texas Governor Greg Abbott is pledging to outlaw Big Tech’s left-wing censorship, announcing his support of a bill in the Texas State Senate that would open social media monopolies to lawsuits from users at a state level.

State Senator Bryan Hughes Senate Bill 12 would provide legal recourse for users of Big Tech platforms who are banned from the services to return, designating Big Tech monopolies such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook as common carriers.

“They are common carriers and they cannot discriminate against people … it’s a violation of the first amendment,” Hughes said. “This is going to protect Texas’ free speech and get them back online.

These are the areas that used to be the courthouse square where people would come and talk,” said Abbott of the legislation. “Now, people are going to Facebook and Twitter to talk about their political ideas, and what Facebook and Twitter are doing — they are controlling the flow of information, and sometimes denying the flow of information.

Texas is taking a stand against big tech political censorship. We are not going to allow it in the Lone Star state.

The law establishing legal recourse against online censorship may prove legally durable enough to avoid breaching Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. That law provides immunity for user-created content on internet platforms, and doesn’t give social media platforms a right to discriminate against active or potential users on the basis of political ideology.

The future for fighting Big Tech censorship lies at a state level. While some state Republican officials have proven reluctant to separate themselves from the lucrative business lobbies of Big Tech oligarchs, Hughes’ approach seems legally innovative enough to give free speech defenders a fighting shot at free expression online.


Follow me on Gab @WildmanAZ, Twitter @Wildman_AZ, and on Parler @Moorhead.

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