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Ohio State Students Crowdsource to Fund Events Promoting Sexual Deviancy

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The College Fix reported that Ohio State University’s “Sex Week,” a seven-day event marketed as a “judgement-free, inclusive, relatable space” for sex education was funded in 2020 mostly through “crowdsourcing” and some partnerships with local restaurants, according to information that an event organizer provided to the news outlet.

Of the dozens of sex-themed events and meetings featured were workshops with a dominatrix as well as a woman who is a self-proclaimed “orgasm coach” and erotic writer.

Student Advocates for Sexual Health Awareness sponsored this event. According to its website, OSU’s Sex Week is designed for the purpose of “educat[ing] our community about sexual health in all its forms.”

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“We believe that realistic sexual health is interdisciplinary, and includes non-traditional topics like LGBTQ sex ed, healthy masculinity, gender equality, and reproductive rights. We aim to connect to our peers through dynamic, comprehensive activities that are geared towards the needs of our community,” the organization declared.

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The event’s Twitter account posted last month that it expected to raise $3,000 for the week’s events  which concluded last Sunday, February 16. According to the school’s student activities portal, student organizations can “apply for up to $2000 or $3000 in programming funds,” but club president and founder Abby Rinderle informed The College Fix that the group was not using university funds to finance the project.

Rinderle said in email correspondence with The Fix that the school does not grant the highest level of funding to new organizations. “We actually are not eligible for $3,000 because we are a relatively new organization and you have to be established for a few years. We are eligible for $2,000, though we are not using any of those funds for Sex Week. We fundraise outside of Ohio State and partner with various Columbus organizations in order to make Sex Week happen,” Rinderle claimed.

Rinderle noted that the group’s funding came from multiple sources.

“The vast majority came from crowd funding. A small proportion came from restaurant fundraisers, where OSU has a list of restaurants that will allow any student organization to get a certain percent of profits from sales accompanied by a flyer for the organization in a given night,” she stated

Rinderle also mentioned that most of this event became possible because of volunteers.

“I think people are usually surprised by how many speakers simply volunteer their time. Everything is organized and run by students who are passionate about the topic. Almost all event spaces are on campus, and therefore free for students to rent.”

Rinderle opted to not specifically mention any of the community partners, “but they are all health-related non-profits or smaller Columbus businesses,” she claimed.

Instead of focusing on higher education, most colleges are either promoting leftist indoctrination or give organization that promote degenerate social behaviors free rein while eschewing traditional morality.

 

 

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Southern Baptist Convention Reverses Course on Name Change After BLP Reporting

They say they’re not changing their name.

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The Southern Baptist Convention has sought to dispel reporting from Big League Politics on the organization’s planned name change, arguing that the institution isn’t formally changing its name.

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But a close look at the American Christian church’s plans relating to its name reveal that it’s played with the idea far more seriously than they’re making it seem.

Reports of a name change first emerged in a Washington Post article published on Tuesday. SBC President JD Greear told the Post that “hundreds of churches” affiliated with the denomination had “committed” to using the phrase “Great Commission Baptist” as an alternative to the denomination’s longtime moniker. The change would come as Greear touts his support of the Black Lives Matter, although he’s been careful in pointing out he doesn’t support any formal organization related to the movement. Greear also is renaming the church he personally pastors with the term.

The SBC’s 2021 convention will also organize under the motto of “We Are Great Commission Baptists.” Sounds a lot like a name change, even if the SBC’s leadership is steadfastly maintaining it isn’t.

The name ‘Great Commission Baptist’ is theologically sound in the Christian religion, but it’s somewhat questionable that the organization’s leader appears to be emphasizing it at a moment in which political correctness is making its entryism into many Christian churches and organizations.

It seems as if the organization’s figurehead is keen to present himself as a liberal-style suburban Evangelical to the Washington Post, but he changed his tune quite quickly when the rank and file membership of Southern Baptist churches learned that he was promoting the idea of a name change.

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