OUT OUT OUT: Ghanian Man to be Deported After Sexually Abusing Step-Daughter

A man will be deported back to his native Ghana after a Department of Justice investigation revealed that he sexually abused his step-daughter for a period of years, and lied about it under oath during his naturalization interview.

“Prempeh Ernest Agyemang, a native of Ghana, was admitted to the United States in 1989,” according to a DOJ press release. “Agyemang then married a United States citizen who had a young child. When the child was in fourth grade, Agyemang began sexually abusing her starting in late 1999 or early 2000. Notably, after the sexual abuse began, while under oath during his naturalization interview, Agyemang stated that he had never committed a crime or offense for which he was not arrested.”

After lying during the interview, Agyemang was arrested and pleaded guilty to the sex crimes. Agyemang lived in Wilmington, NC at the time of his conviction.

Chief Judge James C. Dever III of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina revoked his U.S. citizenship on August 8.

“Relying on this answer, USCIS granted his naturalization application and Agyemang became a U.S. citizen later that year,” the DOJ release said. “On November 5, 2003, Mr. Agyemang pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting his minor stepchild on April 1, 2000.  Specifically, Mr. Agyemang pleaded guilty to Sexual Activity by a Substitute Parent or Custodian.”

“The Justice Department is committed to preserving the integrity of our nation’s immigration system and the propriety of the government’s adjudication of immigration benefits,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Chad A. Readler of the Justice Department’s Civil Division. “We will aggressively pursue the denaturalization of individuals who lie on their naturalization applications or lie during the naturalization interview, especially in a circumstance like this one, which involved an alien who repeatedly sexually abused the minor victim on almost a daily basis.”

The case was investigated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the United the U.S. Department of Justice and and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.