Poland’s Justice Minister Preparing Law to Fine Big Tech Monopolies for Political Censorship of Free Expression

16.09.2019 Kielce , Wojewodzki Szpital Zespolony . Minister Zbigniew Ziobro podczas konferencji prasowej dotyczacej zakupu sprzetu ratujacego zycie za pieniadze pochodzace z Funduszu Sprawiedliwosci . Fot. Pawel Malecki / Agencja Gazeta

Poland’s Justice Minister is preparing a new legal system that will penalize and fine Big Tech companies for censoring lawfully protected free speech online.

The loose Polish translation of Zbigniew Ziobro’s initiative’s title is “The Law on Freedom of Expressing One’s Own Views and Searching and Disseminating Information on the Internet.”

Often, the victims of tendencies for ideological censorship are also representatives of various groups operating in Poland, whose content is removed or blocked, just because they express views and refer to values that are unacceptable from the point of view of communities… with an ever-stronger influence on the functioning of social media,” Mr. Ziobro said of the proposal.

Polish social media users would have the ability to file a compliant within a governmental court system 24 hours after being censored online. The legal proposal Ziobro has set forth recognizes all free speech lawful in Poland with digital protections, taking away the power of censors to make arbitrary judgements on the acceptability of their customers’ free expression.

The legal body Ziobro envisions would evaluate incidences of tech censorship after receipt of evidence, determining if lawful speech was censored with seven days. If it’s found that social media platforms censored wrongfully, they’ll be legally required to restore the deleted content. If they refuse, they could be subject to civil fines of up to $1.8 million euros payable to Poland’s Office of Electronic Communications.

The entire process will be adjudicated electronically, allowing for prompt resolution of political censorship.

This may be the strongest anti-Big Tech legal protection a major country has sought to implement. Were similar proposals to be introduced in other major western companies, the business model of dishonest left-wing censorship would soon lose viability, as Silicon Valley’s tech tyrants would be forced to open their wallets to the users they seek to silence.

Big Tech tyrants have chafed at legal requirements instilled from European countries before. Germany has sought to punish Facebook for failing to institute more censorship, and the platform has been made subject to judgements under EU anti-trust law.

In a peculiar historical twist, the formerly Communist Warsaw Pact nation appears to be leading the western world in envisioning a world beyond the tyrannical grasp of Big Tech Orwellians.