Proposed Legislation in Germany Would Ban “Enemy Lists” for Far-Right, Exempt Journalists and Antifa

Germany could enshrine a law that criminalizes the distribution of a list of potential targets for intimidation or violence. Yet the law would not apply to journalists or Antifa.

The proposed legislation intends to target the far-right only, ostensibly because they may intimidate or threaten politicians and journalists more than the far-left. German minister of justice Christine Lambrecht said about as much according to the AP.

If the legislation were to become law, it would punish people who distribute “enemy lists” with a fine or two years’ imprisonment. The prison sentence could be a year longer if the list included data that isn’t publicly available.

The legislation, still in draft mode, would exempt journalists and Antifa “that seek to expose extremist networks.”

In case you missed it, Big League Politics recently reported on an Elon University professor and “online extremist expert” who collects data on right-wingers and distributes them to her buddies in Antifa and far-left militia groups:

A computer science professor at Elon University has become widely quoted by the mainstream media as an “expert” on “far-right extremism.” But it turns out she’s quite the extremist herself. She collects personal data indiscriminately and sends it to Antifa groups and militias known for their eagerness to engage in political violence.

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Increasing appearances in the media notwithstanding, Squire has been a public figure for several years. In January 2018 Wired favorably profiled her as “Antifa’s secret weapon against far-right extremists.”

Megan Squire is an intelligence operative of sorts, passing along information to those who might put it to real-world use, like Antifa—who can weaponize it,” Wired says.

The tech magazine then boasted of her massive database—dehumanizingly called “Whack-a-Mole”—of some 400,000 people she considers “white nationalists” or “far-right extremists” and her penchant for leaking names to Antifa activists, knowing full well they would post photos and information about the targets online to harass them and get them fired from their jobs.

Squire may say she’s “peaceful” and “doesn’t consider herself to be antifa,” but she makes no bones about being “sympathetic” to Antifa and “unwilling” to disavow Antifa violence, which she describes as a “last resort of a ‘diversity of tactics.’”