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Rapper Killer Mike Puts Kamala Harris and Cory Booker on Blast for Supporting Gun Control

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Yahoo News reports that the rapper Killer Mike says that he does not trust presidential candidates Kamala Harris and Cory Booker on the issue of gun control.

BLP reported on Harris’ desire to use executive action to implement gun control and Booker’s new gun control program which would require extensive licensing and bans so-called “assault weapons.”

Killer Mike, whose real name is Michael Render, told Yahoo News “I don’t trust black leadership that wants to de-arm black people.”

Trending: RIOTS: Ilhan Omar and Her Daughter Encourage Chaos and Mayhem in the Minnesota Streets

Booker has become the posterboy for radical gun control on the Democratic side of the aisle.

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He cites gun violence in his Newark community as his primary motivation for taking up the issue.

Booker told CNN host Jake Tapper in May, “In my community, kids fear fireworks on the Fourth of July because they sound like gunshots.”

He added, “In communities across the country, from Newark to Charlotte, from San Diego to Chicago, and everywhere in between, Americans are being killed and families are being torn apart. We must do better.”

However, Render has a different view on the issue.

As a member of the National African American Gun Association and a firm believer in the right to bear arms, he has pushed for black firearms ownership as a civil rights issue. He contends that many of America’s violence issues could be prevented if gun ownership was equally respected in America from the time of its founding all the way up until the present.

Render argued that “If everyone owned guns from day one, it would have been a lot harder to commit acts like slavery and genocide on Native Americans.”

The rapper then cited the case of the book Guns, Germs and Steel to demonstrate his point:

“If you read the book ‘Guns, Germs and Steel,’ it kind of explains to you, you know, why a lot of the wars indigenous people lost was because people came with superior technology and guns.”

Render understands how gun control laws negatively affect African Americans.

Render declared, “Gun laws affect black people first and worst.”

He then cited investigative journalist and civil rights leader Ida B. Wells who was famous for saying that “a Winchester rifle should have a place of honor in every black home, and it should be used for that protection which the law refuses to give” in the face of lynchings that African Americans were confronting throughout the late 19th century.

The history of black gun ownership is generally glossed over these days by public schools.

But it has a tradition grounded in liberty and self-defense against nefarious actors.

Sadly, this kind of history has fallen by the wayside during the last few decades.

Nevertheless, groups such as Black Guns Matter have helped revive this tradition and are opening up new conversations in urban areas where pro-gun activists have not succeeded in the past.

 

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Rapper Lil Wayne Breaks the Silence on George Floyd’s Death

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On May 29, 2020, Lil Wayne commented on the death of George Floyd.

The controversial death involved Minneapolis Police Department officer Derek Chauvin placing his knee on Floyd’s neck as he was handcuffed on the ground.

“I think when we see these situations, I think we also have to understand that we have to get very specific. … And what I mean by that is we have to stop viewing it with such a broad view, meaning we have to stop placing the blame on the whole force and the whole everybody or a certain race or everybody with a badge,” Wayne remarked during an IG Live chat with rapper Fat Joe.

Wayne added: “We have to actually get into who that person is. And if we want to place the blame on anybody, it should be ourselves for not doing more than what we think we’re doing.”

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On top of that, the New Orleans rapper explained why he doesn’t always go public on these political issues.

“What else am I gonna do after that?” Wayne said to Fat Joe. “Some people put a tweet out and they think they did something. Some people wear a shirt and they think they did something. What you gonna do after that? Did you actually help the person? Did you actually help the family? Did you actually go out there and do something? So, if I ain’t about to do all that, then I ain’t about to do nothing. I’ll pray for ya.”

Wayne shared more of his thoughts regarding how people should process information during times of controversy.

“It’s actually learning about it,” Wayne commented. “What we need to do is we need to learn about it more. If we wanna scream about something, know what we’re screaming about. If we wanna protest about something, know what we’re protesting about. Because if we wanna get into it, there’s a bunch of facts that we think we know that we don’t know. … We scream about things that, sometimes, they really ain’t true.”

Wayne and Joe’s full discussion can be viewed below:

Riots have spread to other cities across the U.S., which included Minneapolis, where Floyd was killed. On May 29, Derek Chauvin received charges of murder and manslaughter in the killing of Floyd.

 

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