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SAT to Add Controversial ‘Adversity Score’ for Test Takers

The standardized test will move away from a completely merit-based system.

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The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) plans to move away from merit-based scoring and add a metric called the “adversity score,” taking into account the socioeconomic background of the test-taker.

“There are a number of amazing students who may have scored less [on the SAT] but have accomplished more,” David Coleman, College Board head, told The Wall Street Journal. “We can’t sit on our hands and ignore the disparities of wealth reflected in the SAT.”

The score will reportedly be based on factors like wealth, crime rate, family life, and school system from which the student hails, and will be assessed within a range between one and 100. Any score above fifty would indicate hardship on the part of the test-taker.

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“The College Board, the non-profit organization that oversees the SAT, has already conducted a test run of the adversity score program at 50 schools, according to the Journal,” according to NBC. “The program will officially roll it out to 150 additional schools by the end of the year, with plans to add more in 2020.”

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Recently, the merit-based system of college acceptance has been called into question. Harvard College is in the midst of a lawsuit claiming that it has discriminated against Asian students who should have been accepted based on test scores, but were denied based on race.

Big League Politics reported:

Court documents unsealed Friday show that Harvard College consistently ranks Asian applicants lower on several personality traits than it does students of different ethnicities in its admissions process.

“Harvard’s admissions officials assign Asian Americans the lowest score of any racial group on the personal rating—a subjective assessment of such traits as whether the student has a ‘positive personality’ and ‘others like to be around him or her,’ has ‘character traits’ such as ‘likability … helpfulness, courage, [and] kindness,’ is an ‘attractive person to be with,’ is ‘widely respected,’ is a ‘good person,’ and has good ‘human qualities,’ say the court documents.

The Ivy League giant has been sued by Students for Fair Admissions, an activist group that is fighting the negative externalities of Affirmative Action, which is supposed to protect minorities against discrimination.

“It turns out that the suspicions of Asian-American alumni, students and applicants were right all along,” Student’s for Fair Admissions attorneys said in the court documents. “Harvard today engages in the same kind of discrimination and stereotyping that it used to justify quotas on Jewish applicants in the 1920s and 1930s.”


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Fox News Ratings Crater, Trailing CNN and MSNBC for First Time in 21 Years

A brutal collapse over the past two-and-a-half months.

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Recent data from Nielsen shows that Fox News finished behind both CNN and MSNBC in ratings to open the month of January.

This is the first time in twenty-one years that that has happened, according to Daily Wire.

Nielsen’s ratings data shows that CNN finished number one among cable news networks with approximately 2.8 million viewers per day from January 4 through January 10, including 4.2 million in primetime.

MSNBC came in second with 2.3 million viewers per day and 3.8 million in primetime. And in third was Fox News with 1.7 million viewers per day and 3.2 million in primetime.

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This is tough data for the conservative-leaning network. Over the past couple decades Fox has become accustomed to completely dominating the ratings, oftentimes receiving more viewership than CNN and MSNBC combined. Several factors contribute to the fall of Fox, including but not limited to:

  • The death of Roger Ailes in 2017 and subsequent changes in network leadership
  • Their disastrous Election Night coverage on November 3
  • Donald Trump’s loss to Joe Biden
  • An ostensible effort to distance themselves from Trump
  • A real or perceived softening of their conservatism in general
  • Trump’s public irritation with the network, to the point of telling people to migrate over to Newsmax and One America News Network (OANN)

Fox News has recently announced lineup changes as well. This is standard practice in the cable news industry and may not have much to do with their suffering ratings, though there’s a likely possibility that it does. Fox will be adding an hour-long opinion show in place of Martha MacCallum’s news show “The Story,” which had fallen behind both CNN and MSNBC’s 7pm timeslots after a stretch of being “comfortably ahead in ratings.” The network will also shuffle some of their daytime lineup.

As Joe Biden works through his first 100 days as president, it will be interesting to see how Fox News continues to perform, not only in comparison with CNN and MSNBC, but also with OANN and Newsmax.

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