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SAT to Add Controversial ‘Adversity Score’ for Test Takers

The standardized test will move away from a completely merit-based system.

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The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) plans to move away from merit-based scoring and add a metric called the “adversity score,” taking into account the socioeconomic background of the test-taker.

“There are a number of amazing students who may have scored less [on the SAT] but have accomplished more,” David Coleman, College Board head, told The Wall Street Journal. “We can’t sit on our hands and ignore the disparities of wealth reflected in the SAT.”

The score will reportedly be based on factors like wealth, crime rate, family life, and school system from which the student hails, and will be assessed within a range between one and 100. Any score above fifty would indicate hardship on the part of the test-taker.

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“The College Board, the non-profit organization that oversees the SAT, has already conducted a test run of the adversity score program at 50 schools, according to the Journal,” according to NBC. “The program will officially roll it out to 150 additional schools by the end of the year, with plans to add more in 2020.”

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Recently, the merit-based system of college acceptance has been called into question. Harvard College is in the midst of a lawsuit claiming that it has discriminated against Asian students who should have been accepted based on test scores, but were denied based on race.

Big League Politics reported:

Court documents unsealed Friday show that Harvard College consistently ranks Asian applicants lower on several personality traits than it does students of different ethnicities in its admissions process.

“Harvard’s admissions officials assign Asian Americans the lowest score of any racial group on the personal rating—a subjective assessment of such traits as whether the student has a ‘positive personality’ and ‘others like to be around him or her,’ has ‘character traits’ such as ‘likability … helpfulness, courage, [and] kindness,’ is an ‘attractive person to be with,’ is ‘widely respected,’ is a ‘good person,’ and has good ‘human qualities,’ say the court documents.

The Ivy League giant has been sued by Students for Fair Admissions, an activist group that is fighting the negative externalities of Affirmative Action, which is supposed to protect minorities against discrimination.

“It turns out that the suspicions of Asian-American alumni, students and applicants were right all along,” Student’s for Fair Admissions attorneys said in the court documents. “Harvard today engages in the same kind of discrimination and stereotyping that it used to justify quotas on Jewish applicants in the 1920s and 1930s.”


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Here’s Where Hispanics Will Play a Decisive Role in the 2020 Elections

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In 2020, Hispanics will leave their mark in presidential elections.

During the present election cycle, Hispanics will be the country’s largest ethnic minority in a U.S. presidential contest. 32 million Hispanics will be expected to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election. They will make up 13.3 percent of all eligible voters. That said, the number of Hispanic eligible voters is significantly lower than the 60 million Hispanics who live in the country.

Nationally speaking, 62 percent of Hispanic registered voters identify with or lean towards the Democratic Party  On the other hand, 34 percent hold similar inclinations with the Republican Party.

Pew Research Center highlighted five key facts about the geographic distribution of the Latino vote for the 2020 presidential election:

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Here are five facts about the geography of Latino voters for the upcoming 2020 presidential election:

1 Two-in-three Latino eligible voters live in just five states. California alone holds roughly a quarter of the nation’s Latino electorate, with 7.9 million Latino eligible voters. Texas is second with 5.6 million, followed by Florida (3.1 million), New York (2.0 million) and Arizona (1.2 million).

2 Latinos make up the highest share of eligible voters in New Mexico (43%). The other top states are California (30%), Texas (30%), Arizona (24%) and Florida (20%).

3 Texas’ 20th Congressional District is home to 359,000 Latino eligible voters, the highest number of any congressional district in the country. Texas’ 16th, 34th and 23rd districts, and Florida’s 26th District, round out the top five, each with at least 321,000 Latino eligible voters.

4 California’s 40th District has the nation’s highest share (80%) of Latinos among its eligible voter population. Texas is home to the next four highest districts, where at least seven-in-ten eligible voters in each are Latino: the 34th District (79%), 16th District (77%), 15th District (73%) and the 28th District (71%).

In 26 congressional districts, Latinos represent at least half of all eligible voters. Most are in California (11 districts) and Texas (eight districts). Florida (25th, 26th and 27th districts), Arizona (3rd and 7th districts), New York (15th District) and Illinois (4th District) also are home to congressional districts that meet this threshold.

5 Only about half of the nation’s 60 million Hispanics are eligible to vote – the smallest share of any racial or ethnic group. While the Hispanic population has grown rapidly in recent decades, many are not eligible voters. More than other racial or ethnic groups, many Hispanics are young (18.6 million are under 18 years old) or non-citizen adults (11.3 million, more than half of whom are unauthorized immigrants).

Hispanics will be one of the key constituents that will play a huge role in American politics from here on out. Despite all the media hype about them being a reliable bloc vote because of the GOP’s  supposedly tough stances on immigration restriction, many Hispanics do in fact support tighter controls on immigration. Additionally, in certain crucial swing states such as Florida, Hispanics are beginning to head on over to the Republican side.

Trump’s national populism, not Hispandering, is key in making sure that Democrats don’t turn the Hispanic vote into a dominate segment of its coalition. All things considered, Hispanics will play a pivotal role in leading Donald Trump  to victory on November 3.

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