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Senate Panel Votes in Favor of Assaulting American History by Approving Motion to Rename Military Bases

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The Senate Armed Services Committee, which is led by Republicans, approved an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that would mandate the Pentagon to rename bases and other facilities that are named in honor of Confederate military leaders, according to a report from the The Hill.

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren offered the amendment and the amendment was approved by a voice vote on June 10, 2020 during the committee’s “closed-door markup of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).” Under this amendment, the Pentagon would be given three years to remove the Confederate names.

This news was originally reported by Roll Call after President Trump said he would “not even consider” renaming Army bases that were named in honor of Confederate leaders.

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During a press briefing on June 10, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany also indicated that Trump would veto the NDAA if the policy bill had language that required the renaming of the bases.

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“These Monumental and very Powerful Bases have become part of a Great American Heritage, and a history of Winning, Victory, and Freedom,” Trump tweeted.

“Therefore, my Administration will not even consider the renaming of these Magnificent and Fabled Military Installations,” the president added.

Two days before Trump made his tweets, an Army spokesperson said Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy and Defense Secretary Mark Esper were receptive to renaming the 10 bases that are named in honor of Confederate military leaders.

The bases, which are located in Southern states, are Fort Lee, Fort Hood, Fort Benning, Fort Gordon, Fort Bragg, Fort Polk, Fort Pickett, Fort A.P. Hill, Fort Rucker, and Camp Beauregard.

The decision to change these names came during the national hysteria over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died when a police officer knelt on his neck for more than eight minutes, which allegedly caused him to suffocate.

One Republican senator on the Armed Services Committee voiced his opposition to the amendment.

“I opposed this amendment, spoke against it, and voted no in the committee,” Senator Josh Hawley tweeted on  June 11. “Congress should not be mandating renaming of our bases and military installations.”

According to The Hill, the “NDAA covers everything from routine matters such as troop pay and how many planes and ships the military can buy to, often, the hot-button defense issues of the moment.”

“LET HIM VETO THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT OVER THIS ISSUE LET’S GO!” Hawaii Senator Brian Schatz tweeted on June 10 in response to the news about the amendment.

It’s good to see that there are elected officials like Josh Hawley who are willing to stand against political correctness and defend American history. Sadly, most of his republican colleagues would rather join the PC left in trying to erase American history.

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Southern Baptist Convention Reverses Course on Name Change After BLP Reporting

They say they’re not changing their name.

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The Southern Baptist Convention has sought to dispel reporting from Big League Politics on the organization’s planned name change, arguing that the institution isn’t formally changing its name.

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But a close look at the American Christian church’s plans relating to its name reveal that it’s played with the idea far more seriously than they’re making it seem.

Reports of a name change first emerged in a Washington Post article published on Tuesday. SBC President JD Greear told the Post that “hundreds of churches” affiliated with the denomination had “committed” to using the phrase “Great Commission Baptist” as an alternative to the denomination’s longtime moniker. The change would come as Greear touts his support of the Black Lives Matter, although he’s been careful in pointing out he doesn’t support any formal organization related to the movement. Greear also is renaming the church he personally pastors with the term.

The SBC’s 2021 convention will also organize under the motto of “We Are Great Commission Baptists.” Sounds a lot like a name change, even if the SBC’s leadership is steadfastly maintaining it isn’t.

The name ‘Great Commission Baptist’ is theologically sound in the Christian religion, but it’s somewhat questionable that the organization’s leader appears to be emphasizing it at a moment in which political correctness is making its entryism into many Christian churches and organizations.

It seems as if the organization’s figurehead is keen to present himself as a liberal-style suburban Evangelical to the Washington Post, but he changed his tune quite quickly when the rank and file membership of Southern Baptist churches learned that he was promoting the idea of a name change.

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