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Texas Catholics Want to Flood the Lone Star State with Third World Refugees, Governor Greg Abbott Says No!

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After Texas Governor Greg Abbott announced on January 10, 2020 that he will not be accepting refugees for resettlement in the state, Catholic organizations were infuriated by his decision.

Abbot’s decision made Texas the first state to reject refugee resettlement after President Donald Trump issued an executive order last year ordering governors to publicly say if they will accept refugees after June 2020.

As of now, governors in 42 states have declared that they wil bring in more refugees. Governors from the five remaining states — Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi and South Carolina — have yet to respond by the January 21, 2020.

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Texas bishops were disappointed by Abbott’s course of action and urged him to reconsider. In a January 10 statement, the Texas Catholic Conference asserted that the move to “turn away refugees from the great state of Texas” was “deeply discouraging and disheartening.”

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The conference claimed it “respects the governor” but declared that Abbott’s decision in this case was “simply misguided” due to how it denied “people who are fleeing persecution, including religious persecution, from being able to bring their gifts and talents to our state and contribute to the general common good of all Texans.”

In a letter he wrote to Pompeo, Abbott stressed the work Texas has done taking in refugees, saying that since fiscal year 2010 “more refugees have been received in Texas than any other state.”

“Texas has carried more than its share in assisting the refugee resettlement process and appreciates that other states are available to help with these efforts,” the letter stated.

Ashley Feasley, the Director of Policy for Migration and Refugee Services of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, told Catholic News Service that Abbott’s decision is a “big deal” because the state has resettled 10% of refugees in the United States during the last decade.

She clarified that the move does not mean that refugees can’t visit the state. It just means they cannot be resettled there.

That decision, she said is troubling. First off, roughly 80% of the refugee cases are described as “follow to join.” In other words, these cases involve individuals who have been vetted, are looking to connect with a family member or friend in the community. Allowing them to resettle with people they already know is something resettlement agencies try to respect, she stated, because it helps with the settlement transition.

She also pointed out how Abbott’s decision, and others to come from remaining state governors who have made a decision on the matter, could be affected by a federal judge’s ruling on Trump’s order expected on January 17, 2020. The judge will be ruling on the lawsuit that three refugee resettlement organizations filed in an attempt to obtain a preliminary injunction to block the executive order.

Abbott, who is also a Catholic, should stand firm and not give in to the pressure that pro-mass migration organizations are placing on him. He should maintain his course as one of the most hardline governors on the issue of immigration.

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Here’s Where Hispanics Will Play a Decisive Role in the 2020 Elections

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In 2020, Hispanics will leave their mark in presidential elections.

During the present election cycle, Hispanics will be the country’s largest ethnic minority in a U.S. presidential contest. 32 million Hispanics will be expected to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election. They will make up 13.3 percent of all eligible voters. That said, the number of Hispanic eligible voters is significantly lower than the 60 million Hispanics who live in the country.

Nationally speaking, 62 percent of Hispanic registered voters identify with or lean towards the Democratic Party  On the other hand, 34 percent hold similar inclinations with the Republican Party.

Pew Research Center highlighted five key facts about the geographic distribution of the Latino vote for the 2020 presidential election:

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Here are five facts about the geography of Latino voters for the upcoming 2020 presidential election:

1 Two-in-three Latino eligible voters live in just five states. California alone holds roughly a quarter of the nation’s Latino electorate, with 7.9 million Latino eligible voters. Texas is second with 5.6 million, followed by Florida (3.1 million), New York (2.0 million) and Arizona (1.2 million).

2 Latinos make up the highest share of eligible voters in New Mexico (43%). The other top states are California (30%), Texas (30%), Arizona (24%) and Florida (20%).

3 Texas’ 20th Congressional District is home to 359,000 Latino eligible voters, the highest number of any congressional district in the country. Texas’ 16th, 34th and 23rd districts, and Florida’s 26th District, round out the top five, each with at least 321,000 Latino eligible voters.

4 California’s 40th District has the nation’s highest share (80%) of Latinos among its eligible voter population. Texas is home to the next four highest districts, where at least seven-in-ten eligible voters in each are Latino: the 34th District (79%), 16th District (77%), 15th District (73%) and the 28th District (71%).

In 26 congressional districts, Latinos represent at least half of all eligible voters. Most are in California (11 districts) and Texas (eight districts). Florida (25th, 26th and 27th districts), Arizona (3rd and 7th districts), New York (15th District) and Illinois (4th District) also are home to congressional districts that meet this threshold.

5 Only about half of the nation’s 60 million Hispanics are eligible to vote – the smallest share of any racial or ethnic group. While the Hispanic population has grown rapidly in recent decades, many are not eligible voters. More than other racial or ethnic groups, many Hispanics are young (18.6 million are under 18 years old) or non-citizen adults (11.3 million, more than half of whom are unauthorized immigrants).

Hispanics will be one of the key constituents that will play a huge role in American politics from here on out. Despite all the media hype about them being a reliable bloc vote because of the GOP’s  supposedly tough stances on immigration restriction, many Hispanics do in fact support tighter controls on immigration. Additionally, in certain crucial swing states such as Florida, Hispanics are beginning to head on over to the Republican side.

Trump’s national populism, not Hispandering, is key in making sure that Democrats don’t turn the Hispanic vote into a dominate segment of its coalition. All things considered, Hispanics will play a pivotal role in leading Donald Trump  to victory on November 3.

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