Connect with us

Good News

Trump Gives Veteran Hope With Executive Order Aimed At Ending Veteran Suicides

President Trump is providing hope to veterans struggling with depression and PTSD.

Published

on

Executive Order Gives Veterans Hope

President Donald J. Trump received high praise from a Kansas veteran for his executive order aimed at ending the veteran suicide crisis in America.

Third generation Army veteran Marcus Beshir of Kansas is optimistic that President Trump’s executive order can give veterans the much needed support they need after they end their military career and help prevent suicides.

Speaking to KAKE TV in Wichita, Kansas, Beshir explained that after years of military service took a toll on his body, he found himself depressed, and at times unable to leave his bed.

Trending: Tennessee’s Marsha Blackburn Calls on Ilhan Omar to Resign After Minnesota Democrat Calls to “Dismantle” U.S. “System of Oppression”

From KAKE TV:

take our poll - story continues below

RIOTS: Who do you blame for the violence on America's streets?

  • RIOTS: Who do you blame for the violence on America's streets?

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Big League Politics updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

“I have had suicidal thoughts in the past,” he said. “I even had it sometimes during the military when I was in the Army where I just felt so alone.”

It would get worse for him after he left the service.

“I didn’t want to move, I didn’t want to get out of bed,” Beshirs said.

Eventually thanks to numerous local agencies who help veterans, and therapists at the VA – he started to become more hopeful and optimistic.

The additional resources President Trump will provide for veterans through the executive order gives Beshir more cause for optimism, as it will give the beleaguered VA, which struggles for funding to treat the myriad of mental and physical ailments, the ability to help veterans.

Currently, 22 veterans take their own life each day as a result of crippling depression and post traumatic stress incurred while serving the nation’s military.

According to the Veterans Administration, the order “mandates the establishment of the Veteran Wellness, Empowerment and Suicide Prevention Task Force,” which will be tasked with creating a road map for stopping the suicide epidemic within one year of its formation.

The VA website also suggests that any veterans struggling with depression or having thoughts of suicide seek help. “Veterans can call the Veterans Crisis Line for confidential support 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Call 800-273-8255 and press 1, send a text message to 838255 or chat online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat,” the website notes.

Good News

JP Morgan Bank Drops Foreclosure Attempt on 100-Year Old WWII Veteran After NY Post Report

The bank had been trying to foreclose on a 100-year old veteran.

Published

on

One of the biggest banks in the United States is giving up on a sleazy attempt to foreclose on the home of a 100-year old World War II veteran, after the New York Post reported on the legal actions that JP Morgan Chase was taking against James Been last week.

The multinational investment bank, with holdings of more than $2.5 trillion dollars, had been trying to foreclose on Been’s home in the Bedford-Stuyvestant neighborhood of Brooklyn. Attorneys for JP Morgan had filed a foreclosure claim in the court system after Been ceased making payments on a $100,000 loan his now-deceased wife had taken out with him in 2006, claiming that he hadn’t been involved in the issuance of the loan and that it was improper for the bank to issue it to a man in his 80’s.

After the Post’s report on the matter, JP Morgan humbly confirmed that they were giving up on the attempt to evict a 100-year old man from the home owned by his family for generations. “Mr. Been will not be evicted from his home and the loan will be forgiven,” said a bank spokesperson.

Been had served in the segregated 93rd Infantry Division during World War II, seeing action in the South Pacific theater of the war. The centenarian described many of his experiences in the armed forces and living in the United States when many communities practiced segregation in his initial profile by the Post. He went on to have a career as a trolley operator and bus driver before retiring.

take our poll - story continues below

RIOTS: Who do you blame for the violence on America's streets?

  • RIOTS: Who do you blame for the violence on America's streets?

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Big League Politics updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Fortunately, it appears the shaming of the rapacious financial interests has ensured the veteran will keep his home.

Continue Reading
It's time to name Antifa a terror org! Sign your petition now!


Trending