Twitter Reveals that Chicoms are Exerting Tremendous Influence on Twitter to Spread Propaganda

According to a report by Natalie Winters, Twitter announced that China used approximately 200,000 fake accounts to meddle in American politics.

These numbers are in stark contrast to Russia, which had less than 1,200 accounts. Because Russia is the Left’s new boogieman, China’s overwhelming presence in American internal affairs is overlooked.

This news was published on June 11, 2020 after a revealing Mediaite report illuminated the extent that fake accounts were involved on Twitter.

Twitter published the information in a report titled, “Disclosing networks of state-linked information operations we’ve removed.”

The report details how the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) used two methods of targeting Twitter users through the use of Chinese propaganda, which Winters detailed:

  1. 23,750 accounts that comprise the core of the network, e.g. the highly engaged core network;
  2. Approximately 150,000 accounts that were designed to boost this content, e.g. the amplifiers. Based on feedback from researchers on our prior disclosures that we need to better refine the disclosure process to enable efficient investigation of the core activity, we have not included the 150,000 amplifier accounts in the public archive.

Twitter highlighted how these pro-Chinese accounts were “involved in a range of manipulative and coordinated activities” and “spreading geopolitical narratives favorable to the Communist Party of China (CCP), while continuing to push deceptive narratives about the political dynamics in Hong Kong.”

Witners called attention to how these actions followed the spirit of a decree that Xi Jinping issued in 2016 which called for robust propaganda efforts “wherever the readers are, wherever the viewers are.”

The report highlighted how Russia’s activities were confined to “1,152 accounts and associated media” involved in “promoting the United Russia party and attacking political dissidents.”

It’s abundantly clear that China poses a larger threat to the U.S. than Russia. The Cold War is over, and while China has reformed a bit, it still has aspirations of dominating the globe at America’s expense.

In a saner political climate, the U.S. would be using realpolitik to strategically align itself with Russia as a means of checking Chinese influence. Unfortunately, we don’t live in that world thanks to the neoliberal and neoconservative consensus that dominates D.C.