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WATCH: ‘You Can’t Watch This’ Movie Will Reveal Impact of Big Tech Censorship

“You Can’t Watch This” will offer in depth accounts from those who have been purged by big tech.

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You Cant Watch This Tech Censorship

“You Can’t Watch This” is a new film promises to chronicle the big tech purges of Alex Jones, Laura Loomer, Tommy Robinson, Gavin McInnes, and Paul Joseph Watson.

The movie, set to be released on May 15, will offer a behind-the-scenes perspective on the recent waves of censorship at the hands of big tech companies that has resulted in prominent conservatives being removed from the public sphere.

Responding to Big League Politics’ request for comment, British filmmaker George Llewellyn-John explains that he hopes to inform the world that social media is a vital part of modern life, and excluding members of the public from it represents a direct threat.

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“People think it’s just social media, we still have this outdated view of it,” wrote Llewellyn-John. “In reality social media is where we live our lives, where we refine our views and hammer out important cultural issues.”

He added, “It’s the one person one vote principle. It doesn’t matter how educated you are or what your income is or what you do for a living – you get a vote. It should be the same for social media.”

Llewellyn-John hopes the video will help “mainstream conservatives” understand the impact of social media on their political goals, and convince those across the aisle they they may not be immune to the pitfalls of tech censorship.

“I hope people on the right, particularly the mainstream right, will realise how big a problem this is for them.” He also hopes “people on the left will realise this issue is going to start affecting them as well.”

“We have to stop viewing Free Speech as a one sided issue,” he added.

Llewellyn-John made clear that he does not politically align himself with some of the figures in the movie, but finds it important to tell their story because “if the First Amendment isn’t for everyone then it isn’t for anyone.”

The movie has been in production for some time, Llewellyn-John explains that “as things heated up” he rapidly pushed up his production schedule for the May 15 release.

“You Can’t Watch This” began production in January of this year, and includes critical moments of history including “Tommy Robinson making his last livestream on Facebook before he was banned,” and “Gavin McInnes wrestling with the prospect of starting from scratch.”

Llewellyn-John concluded by telling Big League Politics that the timing of the movie is “perfect” and that “for the people involved it’s never been more urgent.”

“You Can’t Watch This” will be released on May 15 exclusively on Vimeo.

Free Speech

YOUR NEW MASTER: Twitter’s Head of Conversational Safety, a “Young, Queer Asian-American Businesswoman,” is “Rethinking” the Concept of User Safety

Do you trust someone like her to make Twitter “a safer place”?

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The media company Protocol, a sister site of Politico, recently published an article about Twitter’s new “head of product for conversational safety,” Christine Su. It claims that Su, a “young, queer Asian-American businesswoman,” is revolutionizing what “user safety” on social media means.

Twitter hired Su around six months ago to be in charge of “what might be the most difficult task on Twitter,” despite having no apparent experience in politics, programming, and media relations. But Twitter seems to like her for her “creative” and “somewhat radical new ideas” about user safety.

“As a queer woman of color who is an Asian American in tech in rural America, that experience is a very intersectional one. I’ve had plenty of experiences moving through spaces where I wanted more safety,” Su said.

Protocol writes that Su’s vision incorporates “transformative and procedural justice.” Transformative justice ostensibly refers to a non-retributive form of repairing harm done to someone and preventing it from happening again; procedural justice to enacting a set of rules that “make harm rarer in the first place.”

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This all sounds nice and dandy—but beware. So-called transformative and procedural justice will not benefit you, but will crush you. Anything that’s perceived as “harmful” against “women and people from marginalized groups” can and will be used to censor you. Christine Su may reassuringly claim that “the point is not to make the entire world a safe space,” but she’s open about the fact that she will help give the Coalition of the Fringes more control over what people are allowed to do and say on Twitter.

Examples from the article:

  • Creating an audio hangout feature called “Spaces,” which will allow users to determine who is allowed to participate, as well as who can speak and when. (Note that it’s being tested on “women and marginalized groups of people” first.)
  • Potentially doubling down on functions that “encourage people to read content before reposting it.” (Which is exclusively done to censor or limit the reach of conservative and other right-wing content.)
  • Building tools that “create private pathways for apologies, forgiveness and deescalation.” (The finer details are still a work in progress according to Su.)
  • Defining what a “meaningful conversation” is. (Would people like Su think that anything right-wingers say or believe belongs in a “meaningful conversation”? Let’s just say I wouldn’t bet money on it…)

You know full well that a company like Facebook would shortly follow suit. After all, it’s not just Twitter that Su is “revolutionizing,” but the concept of social media itself. Figure out where all this is heading.

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