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WEAK: Army Football Program Changes Their Motto to Appease Social Justice Warriors

The innocuous phrase was considered to be white supremacist.

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The Army football program has folded to social justice pressure and announced that they will be dropping its signature motto due to its perceived racism.

For many years, the team has put the letters “GFBD” on a black skull-and-crossbones flag while entering the field. The letters stand for “God Forgives, Brothers Don’t,” and the black flag is waved next to the American flag as they prepare for battle against the opposing team. It has become a popular rallying cry for the football players, and the letters were even engraved on their rings after Army won the Armed Forces Bowl.

That phrase has now been deemed racist, and after some complaints to West Point officials were filed, the football team caved to the pressure.

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“It’s embarrassing, quite frankly,” said Lt. Gen. Darryl Williams, the superintendent of the United States Military Academy. “… We take stuff like this very, very seriously. Once I found out about this goofiness, I asked one of our most senior colonels to investigate.”

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Head football coach Jeff Monken said he was “mortified” by the use of the phrase and called it a “teaching moment” in which social justice dogma could be instilled upon the players. No aspect of society is safe from this encroaching agenda nowadays.

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has led the charge to demonize this statement that has been regularly used by biker gangs across the country. Similar to their demonization of the ‘OK’ hand symbol and the bowl cut in recent months, they classify the statement as hate speech.

According to a West Point investigation, cadets started using the phrase after seeing it used in a popular action movie. The investigators determined that use of the motto was “benign” and done without the knowledge of “the views or beliefs of white supremacist groups or any other disreputable organizations with which they might also be associated.”

One of the team’s upperclassman confirmed how important the motto was to him and other cadets. However, comradely and toughness are no longer permissible in the age of political correctness.

“That’s become our symbol,” the upperclassman said to ESPN. “I don’t know if you can see it, but it says ‘GFBD’ over the teeth: God Forgives, Brothers Don’t. That’s just something we always say, and that’s become part of us.”

The Army football team is currently devising a new motto that will appease the lynch mob of tolerance and diversity.

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ESPN Writer Says ‘F*ck You’ to Josh Hawley for Calling Out the NBA’s Hypocritical Groveling to China

These sports personalities really hate America.

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ESPN writer Adrian Wojnarowski wrote “f*ck you” to Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) in response to his letter criticizing the NBA for groveling to China and refusing to support the U.S. military and law enforcement.

Hawley posted the response he received directly from Wojnarowski after issuing a press release on Twitter:

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“On July 3, the National Basketball Association (NBA) came to an agreement with the NBA players union allowing players to wear certain social and political messages on their jerseys, almost all aligned with the message of recent anti-police protests. Conspicuously missing from the list of approved phrases are any in support of the victims of the Communist Chinese Party (CCP), including the people of Hong Kong, whose remaining freedoms are being extinguished by the CCP’s newly-enacted national security law,” Hawley wrote in the letter.

“The league’s new policy suggests a newfound commitment to enhanced employee expression. But that free expression appears to stop at the edge of your corporate sponsors’ sensibilities. And for woke capital today, profits from the Chinese market are more popular than patriotism,” he continued.

“With your new policy, you have crossed the line of sanctioning specific political messages. There is no avoiding the work of clarifying the association’s values now. This is a time for you to make clear what your league believes about human rights and about the nation that is your home. Your silence on these questions speaks volumes,” Hawley added.

The full text of Hawley’s letter can be seen here:

Big League Politics has reported on ESPN’s bowing to China even while devoting copious amounts of time to anti-American programming on their network:

An internal ESPN memo mandated neutrality when dealing with the China-Hong Kong conflict after National Basketball Association general manager Daryl Morey made a pro-Hong Kong tweet last week that angered the Chinese government, according to a Deadspin report.

Morey, who is the general manager of the Houston Rockets team, wrote a tweet that was published on Oct. 4, saying, “Fight for Freedom. Stand with Hong Kong.” Although he deleted the comment shortly after he posted it, the backlash from China was immediate and severe.

NBA commissioner Adam Silver released a weak statement after the controversy grew, in an obvious attempt not to alienate the Chinese market that they see as a growing revenue stream.

“Over the last three decades, the NBA has developed a great affinity for the people of China. We have seen how basketball can be an important form of people-to-people exchange that deepens ties between the United States and China,” Silver said in his statement.

“At the same time, we recognize that our two countries have different political systems and beliefs. And like many global brands, we bring our business to places with different political systems around the world,” he added.

ESPN, the Disney-owned television network that has helped turn the NBA into a worldwide phenomenon, is taking a similarly pro-China stance regarding the conflict, and it is represented in their programming.

“Daryl Morey, a good man, an exceptional executive, and a conscientious human being, what were you thinking speaking up on this issue?” commentator Stephen A. Smith asked on his ESPN radio show. “It’s about a multitude of people that extends far beyond yourself that you have compromised because you had this insatiable appetite to disseminate a tweet. You don’t know better than that?”

Patriotic Americans built the professional sports industry into a global powerhouse, and now these entities are biting the hand that feeds in pursuit of raw profit.

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