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Yellow Vests Plan Protest Outside Rothschild Bank In France

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Yellow Vests Protest Rothschild Bank

Yellow Vest protesters are planning another demonstration, this time outside the Rothschild Bank of Lyon, France.

A Facebook event reveals over 3,000 French Yellow Vest protesters have expressed interest in attending a protest at the Rothschild Bank of Lyon, France, due in part to a 40-year-old grievance with France’s private banking system.

The event description explains that “The [French] state borrows from private banks, digs debt,” allowing the private banks to make money from interest loans made to the French government.

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In 1973, after intense lobbying from the Rothschild Bank of France, French President George Pompidou signed legislation preventing the government from taking 0 percent interest loans from the Bank of France, the country’s central bank. Instead, the Bank of France is required to loan money to private banks, such as the Rothschild Bank of France, which can then lend money to the French government with interest.

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The Huffington Post reported in 2012:

In 1973, France did not have a debt problem and the national budget was balanced. Indeed, the state could borrow directly from the Bank of France to finance the building of schools, road infrastructure, ports, airlines, hospitals and cultural centers, something that it was possible to do without being required to pay an exorbitant interest rate. Thus, the government rarely found itself in debt. Nonetheless, on January 3, 1973, the government of President George Pompidou — Pompidou was himself a former general director of the Rothschild Bank — influenced by the financial sector, adopted Law no.73/7 focusing on the Bank of France. It was nicknamed the “Rothschild law” because of the intense lobbying by the banking sector which favored its adoption. Formulated by Olivier Wormser, Governor of the Bank of France, and Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, then Minister of the Economy and Finance, it stipulates in Article 25, that “the State can no longer demand discounted loans from the Bank of France.”

Many of the Yellow Vest protesters point to this legislation as the cause of France’s swelling public debt. Since 1980, France’s public debt expanded from a historic low of 56.17 percent of France’s Gross Domestic Product to 97 percent in 2017.

“Very good initiative,” one protester wrote on Facebook, “Finally we protest the real debt managers and not their puppets.”

The protest, titled “Les Gilets Jaune Bloque La Banque Rothschild de Lyon”, is scheduled for Tuesday, January 9.

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Polish Election: National Conservative President Andrzej Duda Leads, Will Face Soros-Linked Liberal Challenger in Runoff

Poland’s President won the first round of the runoff.

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Poland’s national conservative President, Andrzej Duda, will face liberal Warsaw Mayor Rafal Trzaskowski in a runoff election in July. Duda, of the Law and Justice Party, recieved a strong electoral plurality in the first round of elections, taking just under 44%. Trzaskowski recieved 30%, and will be the sole candidate competing against Duda in the runoff elections.

Trzaskowski favors further integrating Poland with the European Union, and has pitched his candidacy to global liberal western elites irritated by euroskeptic and nationalist sentiment in Poland. He’s attended the globalist Bilderberg Conference, and received a scholarship from the Soros Foundation in the early 90’s as a student.

Trzaskowski also led the movement within the country to resettle thousands of Middle Eastern refugees in Poland during the 2015 migrant crisis, a policy that was overturned after Duda took office that year.

Duda has campaigned on reforming the nation’s judiciary, resisting political imperatives from unelected European Union bureaucrats in Brussels(without calling for the Eastern European nation to leave the EU), and opposition to attempts to promote a western-style cultural agenda in Poland. Duda has spoken against the promotion of homosexual ideology in the country, comparing the previous generation’s experiences living under communism to the liberal agenda. “They didn’t fight for this so that a new ideology would appear that is even more destructive,” said Duda in a campaign rally earlier this month.

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Various other political parties competed in the first round elections, including other right-wing and conservative parties, who marshaled approximately 9% of the vote combined. If Duda can unite voters inclined to vote for parties to the right of Law and Justice, he stands a strong chance to cruise to an easy victory with more than 50% of the vote.

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