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Alabama Sen. Doug Jones: Pro-Life Legislators ‘Extreme, ‘Callous’

The first-term Senator is displeased that his Republicans are keeping their promise to fight for the unborn.

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An Alabama Senator who won his election with the help of a sophisticated online scheme funded by Silicon Valley, and still-unproven allegations of sexual misconduct against his opponent, resorted to name calling after Republican legislators in his state voted to protect the lives of the unborn.

“These Republican legislators, who are overwhelmingly men, are so extreme and so callous that they would overwhelmingly support a bill that denies a woman a Constitutional right that they have had for decades – they would take away that right and make their doctors and healthcare providers criminals,” Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) said.

Tuesday, the Alabama Senate passed a pro-life bill banning abortions outright, ostensibly protecting the lives of all unborn children.

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Jones neglected to mention that the Governor of Alabama, Kay Ivey, who is expected to sign the bill into law, is a woman. He went on to bemoan the fact that the bill provides no exceptions in extremely rare cases of rape and incest.

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“And to add insult to injury, they stood and applauded the passage of this extreme bill,” Jones whined.

Jones, a Democrat in a deeply red state, has watched his approval rating plummet during his tenure in office.

Big League Politics reported:

U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-Ala.) eked out a 21,000 vote victory over Judge Roy Moore in a Dec. 2017 special election, but his approval rating has plummeted since assuming office.

“[J]ones’s net approval rating has dropped 17 points since the first quarter of 2018, according to quarterly rankings of U.S. Senators,” said an AL.com report.

The report cited a recent Morning Consult Poll, which places Jones’ approval rating at 40 percent, and disapproval rating at 35 percent. The poll notes that 25 percent have no opinion on Jones.

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Congress

FLASHBACK: Three Recent Supreme Court Justices Were Confirmed Within 45 Days

There’s ample precedent for a quick confirmation.

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There are 45 days until the November 3rd presidential election, and there’s ample precedent for an expedited confirmation of a Supreme Court Justice in such a timeframe following a vacancy.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg died on Friday, setting up a possible contentious confirmation process to fill her seat. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pledging that a tentative Trump administration nominee for the position will receive a vote on the Senate floor, despite outrage and indignation on the part of progressives falsely maintaining that McConnell is breaking precedent he set by refusing to confirm Merrick Garland. President Obama tried to get Garland confirmed when the opposing party controlled the Senate, a divided government that does not exist in 2020.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg herself was formally nominated by President Clinton on June 22nd, 1993. Her confirmation process began on July 20th, and she was confirmed on August 3rd, with a total of 42 days elapsing between her nomination and confirmation.

John Paul Stevens’ nomination was advanced and confirmed in a speedy 19 days, and Sandra Day O’Connor was confirmed in 1981 in a total of 33 days.

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In fact, every single Supreme Court nomination of the past 45 years was nominated and voted upon within a shorter duration of the time remaining in Donald Trump’s first presidential term.

There’s actually wide precedent for nominating and confirming a Supreme Court justice within the confines of President Trump’s first term, and Democrats are being untruthful or erroneous to suggest otherwise.

McConnell is beginning initial work to advance confirmation hearings, with potential liberal Republicans such as Mitt Romney, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski presenting themselves as possible holdouts. It is possible to approve a judge with 50 votes in the Senate and a Vice Presidential tiebreaker.

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