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Denver Riggleman Resorts to Lawfare to Keep Congressional Seat During Coronavirus Pandemic

Riggleman is considering a lawsuit against the Virginia Republican Party.

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Congressman Denver Riggleman, the anti-Trump gay marriage officiator representing Virginia’s 5th District, has resorted to lawfare as he tries to hang on to his seat during the coronavirus crisis.

A draft lawsuit has been made, although not filed at the present time, on behalf of Riggleman and his political committee against the Virginia Department of Elections, the Republican Party of Virginia, the 5th District Republican Party committee, and various state election officials.

Riggleman hopes that his legal threat will make the state GOP and district GOP conduct a primary rather than a convention because of the coronavirus pandemic.

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“Given the current pandemic impacting the Commonwealth and the Nation, as a member of the Committee, I would, if permitted by the Republican Party of Virginia and permitted by the laws of the Commonwealth, vote to have a primary and instruct the Fifth District Chairman to notify the Virginia State Board of Elections of the intent to hold a primary election in the Fifth Congressional District,” states Riggleman’s proposed declaration in support of plaintiffs’ motion for preliminary injunction submitted to committee members.

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Bob Good, Riggleman’s right-wing challenger for the seat who has called out the incumbent’s anti-conservative record on social issues, claims that he has enough delegates supporting him to defeat Riggleman at convention. He believes that Riggleman’s lawfare is a desperate attempt to preserve his political career.

Good’s supporters have drafted another lawsuit against Riggleman, 5th Committee GOP chairman Melvin Adams and various committee members in an attempt to prevent the arbitrary change. Riggleman’s political campaign is up in arms because of the threat.

“The congressman is appalled and disgusted that the Bob Good campaign would allow one of their most ardent supporters to single out committee members in a lawsuit,” wrote Kurt Lofquist, who works as political director for Riggleman.

“These types of intimidation factors are not in the spirit of the party or law and should not be tolerated,” he added.

Adams says that the lawsuit was unnecessary because “switching to a primary is completely off the table.”

“These threats usually come from people who desperately want to feel they have power, and get their kicks from their expression, similar to individuals who spout off on social media without impunity,” Adams said. “However, the particular presentation and threat to the committee membership was over the top. It is being addressed in an appropriate manner.”

It does not look like Riggleman’s legal maneuvering will be able to change the political process of Virginia. He is just the latest of many government officials attempting to use the turmoil related to the coronavirus pandemic to help his political ambitions.

Congress

FLASHBACK: Three Recent Supreme Court Justices Were Confirmed Within 45 Days

There’s ample precedent for a quick confirmation.

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There are 45 days until the November 3rd presidential election, and there’s ample precedent for an expedited confirmation of a Supreme Court Justice in such a timeframe following a vacancy.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg died on Friday, setting up a possible contentious confirmation process to fill her seat. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pledging that a tentative Trump administration nominee for the position will receive a vote on the Senate floor, despite outrage and indignation on the part of progressives falsely maintaining that McConnell is breaking precedent he set by refusing to confirm Merrick Garland. President Obama tried to get Garland confirmed when the opposing party controlled the Senate, a divided government that does not exist in 2020.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg herself was formally nominated by President Clinton on June 22nd, 1993. Her confirmation process began on July 20th, and she was confirmed on August 3rd, with a total of 42 days elapsing between her nomination and confirmation.

John Paul Stevens’ nomination was advanced and confirmed in a speedy 19 days, and Sandra Day O’Connor was confirmed in 1981 in a total of 33 days.

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In fact, every single Supreme Court nomination of the past 45 years was nominated and voted upon within a shorter duration of the time remaining in Donald Trump’s first presidential term.

There’s actually wide precedent for nominating and confirming a Supreme Court justice within the confines of President Trump’s first term, and Democrats are being untruthful or erroneous to suggest otherwise.

McConnell is beginning initial work to advance confirmation hearings, with potential liberal Republicans such as Mitt Romney, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski presenting themselves as possible holdouts. It is possible to approve a judge with 50 votes in the Senate and a Vice Presidential tiebreaker.

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