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Establishment Republican Senator Remains Silent on Senate Primary in Kansas, Kris Kobach is the Only Choice for Immigration Patriots

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Kansas Senator Jerry Moran is on the fence about endorsing candidates for Kansas’ open Senate seat.

With Pat Roberts retiring, Kansas’ Senate seat is now wide open.

Immigration patriot candidate Kris Kobach quickly jumped into the fray and is looking to make immigration the #1 issue heading into the 2020 elections.

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has already ruled out running for office in his home state.

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Congressman Roger Marshall has now thrown his hat into the ring, appearing to be the establishment candidate of choice in this election.

President Trump has yet to make any endorsement in the Kansas primary.

Given Kobach’s track record on fighting mass migration as Kansas Secretary of State, it would seem that Trump would endorse him.

After all, the strongest feature of Trump’s presidency has been his focus on immigration.

Moran announced that he won’t endorse any of the candidates running in the Republican primary.

“My general practice has been, with only … unintentional circumstances, have I gotten involved with other people’s races,” Moran told reporters last week. “I don’t have any plan to change that practice.”

Pompeo originally raised speculation about running for office after meeting with key Republicans donors such as Wichita resident Charles Koch and casino titan Sheldon Adelson. Not too long ago, Trump stated he would back Pompeo for Senate if it could keep the Kansas seat in Republican hands.

Moran was asked about the implications of this race.

Moran said, “Republican Kansans can make a decision about who their nominee is, Democrat Kansans can make a decision about who their nominee is. And then all Kansans can make a decision who would represent their interests, who they trust to do the job.”

Moran added, “And that’s a reason why I generally stay out of other people’s politics and stay out of the endorsements world, is Kansans understand. The candidates who are there now are pretty well known and they will get even better known between now and the election, and who better to make the decision about who should be the next United States senator than the voters of Kansas?”

These are not very re-assuring words for immigration patriots.

With Marshall in the mix, Moran may actually make a decision in the primaries.

Marshall is a solid Republican, but Kobach has a hawkish immigration streak that may make him unpalatable to political elites.  For immigration patriots, Kobach is the only choice in this election cycle.

All things considered, Kobach will be facing an uphill struggle against an unlikely coalition of Democrats and Republicans trying to block him throughout the 2020 election cycle.

America First believers must follow this race closely and help out in whichever way they can.

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Here’s Where Hispanics Will Play a Decisive Role in the 2020 Elections

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In 2020, Hispanics will leave their mark in presidential elections.

During the present election cycle, Hispanics will be the country’s largest ethnic minority in a U.S. presidential contest. 32 million Hispanics will be expected to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election. They will make up 13.3 percent of all eligible voters. That said, the number of Hispanic eligible voters is significantly lower than the 60 million Hispanics who live in the country.

Nationally speaking, 62 percent of Hispanic registered voters identify with or lean towards the Democratic Party  On the other hand, 34 percent hold similar inclinations with the Republican Party.

Pew Research Center highlighted five key facts about the geographic distribution of the Latino vote for the 2020 presidential election:

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Here are five facts about the geography of Latino voters for the upcoming 2020 presidential election:

1 Two-in-three Latino eligible voters live in just five states. California alone holds roughly a quarter of the nation’s Latino electorate, with 7.9 million Latino eligible voters. Texas is second with 5.6 million, followed by Florida (3.1 million), New York (2.0 million) and Arizona (1.2 million).

2 Latinos make up the highest share of eligible voters in New Mexico (43%). The other top states are California (30%), Texas (30%), Arizona (24%) and Florida (20%).

3 Texas’ 20th Congressional District is home to 359,000 Latino eligible voters, the highest number of any congressional district in the country. Texas’ 16th, 34th and 23rd districts, and Florida’s 26th District, round out the top five, each with at least 321,000 Latino eligible voters.

4 California’s 40th District has the nation’s highest share (80%) of Latinos among its eligible voter population. Texas is home to the next four highest districts, where at least seven-in-ten eligible voters in each are Latino: the 34th District (79%), 16th District (77%), 15th District (73%) and the 28th District (71%).

In 26 congressional districts, Latinos represent at least half of all eligible voters. Most are in California (11 districts) and Texas (eight districts). Florida (25th, 26th and 27th districts), Arizona (3rd and 7th districts), New York (15th District) and Illinois (4th District) also are home to congressional districts that meet this threshold.

5 Only about half of the nation’s 60 million Hispanics are eligible to vote – the smallest share of any racial or ethnic group. While the Hispanic population has grown rapidly in recent decades, many are not eligible voters. More than other racial or ethnic groups, many Hispanics are young (18.6 million are under 18 years old) or non-citizen adults (11.3 million, more than half of whom are unauthorized immigrants).

Hispanics will be one of the key constituents that will play a huge role in American politics from here on out. Despite all the media hype about them being a reliable bloc vote because of the GOP’s  supposedly tough stances on immigration restriction, many Hispanics do in fact support tighter controls on immigration. Additionally, in certain crucial swing states such as Florida, Hispanics are beginning to head on over to the Republican side.

Trump’s national populism, not Hispandering, is key in making sure that Democrats don’t turn the Hispanic vote into a dominate segment of its coalition. All things considered, Hispanics will play a pivotal role in leading Donald Trump  to victory on November 3.

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