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Establishment Republican Senator Remains Silent on Senate Primary in Kansas, Kris Kobach is the Only Choice for Immigration Patriots

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Kansas Senator Jerry Moran is on the fence about endorsing candidates for Kansas’ open Senate seat.

With Pat Roberts retiring, Kansas’ Senate seat is now wide open.

Immigration patriot candidate Kris Kobach quickly jumped into the fray and is looking to make immigration the #1 issue heading into the 2020 elections.

Trending: Arizona Democrat Mark Kelly Refuses to Shake Border Patrol Agent’s Hand: “You’re One of Them”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has already ruled out running for office in his home state.

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Congressman Roger Marshall has now thrown his hat into the ring, appearing to be the establishment candidate of choice in this election.

President Trump has yet to make any endorsement in the Kansas primary.

Given Kobach’s track record on fighting mass migration as Kansas Secretary of State, it would seem that Trump would endorse him.

After all, the strongest feature of Trump’s presidency has been his focus on immigration.

Moran announced that he won’t endorse any of the candidates running in the Republican primary.

“My general practice has been, with only … unintentional circumstances, have I gotten involved with other people’s races,” Moran told reporters last week. “I don’t have any plan to change that practice.”

Pompeo originally raised speculation about running for office after meeting with key Republicans donors such as Wichita resident Charles Koch and casino titan Sheldon Adelson. Not too long ago, Trump stated he would back Pompeo for Senate if it could keep the Kansas seat in Republican hands.

Moran was asked about the implications of this race.

Moran said, “Republican Kansans can make a decision about who their nominee is, Democrat Kansans can make a decision about who their nominee is. And then all Kansans can make a decision who would represent their interests, who they trust to do the job.”

Moran added, “And that’s a reason why I generally stay out of other people’s politics and stay out of the endorsements world, is Kansans understand. The candidates who are there now are pretty well known and they will get even better known between now and the election, and who better to make the decision about who should be the next United States senator than the voters of Kansas?”

These are not very re-assuring words for immigration patriots.

With Marshall in the mix, Moran may actually make a decision in the primaries.

Marshall is a solid Republican, but Kobach has a hawkish immigration streak that may make him unpalatable to political elites.  For immigration patriots, Kobach is the only choice in this election cycle.

All things considered, Kobach will be facing an uphill struggle against an unlikely coalition of Democrats and Republicans trying to block him throughout the 2020 election cycle.

America First believers must follow this race closely and help out in whichever way they can.

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Research Shows that U.S. Hispanics Reject the Ridiculous Label of “Latinx”

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Pew Research Center’s Hispanic trends found that Hispanics are categorically rejecting the label of “Latinx.”

The question of pan-ethnic labels to describe people with origins from Latin America and Spain has been a subject of discussion for decades. Over the decades there has been a consensus to label such people as Hispanic and Latino.

However, the political correctness crowd made sure to politicize these labels by introducing the new term Latinx, which is allegedly gender neutral and pan-ethnic. In the Spanish language, nouns, pronouns, and adjectives have feminine and masculine forms. This is way too much for politically correct activists in the West who want to export their politically correct ethos abroad.

That said, only a few Hispanics have embraced this politically correct flavor of the week. Of the U.S. adults who identify as Hispanic, only 23 percent of them have heard of the term Latinx.  A measly 3 percent indicated that they use the term to describe themselves, according to a bilingual survey of U.S. Hispanic adults carried out in December 2019 by the Pew Research Center.

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Although only a quarter of U.S. Hispanics claim to have heard about the term Latinx, there is a clear generational gap between its usage among different subgroups. Young Hispanics, between the ages of 18 to 29, are the most likely to have heard of the term, with 42 percent of them being acquainted with the term, whereas 7 percent of those 65 or older have heard of the term.

College-educated Hispanics are more likely to have heard the term Latinx than individuals without a college education. Approximately 38 percent of college graduates have heard of Latinx, in addition to 31 percent of those with college experience. By contrast, only 14 percent of those with a high school diploma or less are acquainted with the label.

Additionally, U.S. born Hispanics are more likely than the foreign born to have heard the term (32 percent to 16 percent). Hispanics who mainly speak English or are bilingual are more likely than individuals who mainly speak Spanish to have heard of the term (29 percent for the former vs. 7 percent for the latter.)

Awareness of the term does not translate into overall usage. Of Hispanic women ages 18 to 29, only 14 percent of them use the term. On the other hand, 1 percent of Hispanic men of that age group use the term.

It’s good to hear that Hispanics are rejecting this politically concocted term. The gender wars that the Left is waging are meant to create disruption. The last thing we need in the U.S. is more divisiveness and social instability brought about by the PC mad scientists.

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