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Food Bank in Arkansas Hops on the Anti-Gun Bandwagon

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Rebekah Evans, an Arkansas woman, is leading a new anti-gun effort in her home state.

But she’s getting crafty.

As leader of the Jonesboro chapter of Moms Demand Action, she is now working with a food pantry to hand out pamphlets from Moms Demand’s Be Smart program, “which promotes safe gun storage, alongside food and other emergency supplies” according to a report from The Trace.

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“It’s hard to know how to be helpful in our communities right now, so it was gratifying to do something concrete and something I hope will keep children safe in their homes,” Evans declared.

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Moms Demand Action is a part of Everytown for Gun Safety, one of the most prominent civilian disarmament organizations in the nation. Evans said food pantries have handed out more than 200 pamphlets and are asking for more.

Many of these gun control organizations are becoming fixated with gun safety after record numbers of gun owners are buying firearms during the Wuhan virus lockdowns.

The Trace highlighted the concerns of one gun control leader:

Kyleanne Hunter, the vice president of programs for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, an advocacy group, said it is especially concerning that so many of the people who have bought guns in recent months appear to be first-time gun buyers who don’t have access to the training and other support that they would during normal times.

“Safe storage is not something that people think about when they first buy a gun,” commented Hunter. “It’s like when you go to the pet store and say, ‘Aw, that puppy’s really cute!’ And then you get home and think, ‘Uh oh, who’s going to let it out?’”

Jenna Sullivan, an associate pastor at the Magnolia Road Church in Jonesboro and the coordinator of the Community Services Center Friends and Neighbors Network food distribution program, recounted that she placed safe storage pamphlets next to cornflakes boxes that were sent to families in the past month.

The Trace summarized Sullivan’s views:

Sullivan said guns can be a polarizing issue in her congregation: Some people own firearms and feel strongly about their Second Amendment rights; others are open about disliking guns. But she said it’s important to seek common ground. “I’m pretty committed to finding ways to talk about these things without losing trust or respect, and while keeping a compassionate mindset,” she said.

“I hope people got the information and had that brief moment of being reminded to store guns safely,” Sullivan remarked. “I think that makes a difference.”

Indeed, gun controllers are becoming creative in their efforts to advance gun control.

21st century politics goes beyond the ballot box.

Operatives are looking to infiltrate every nook and cranny of civil society to propagate their message.

The Right must recognize these new strategies and be prepared to counter them by defending civic institutions and taking back territory the Left has seized.

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Southern Baptist Convention Reverses Course on Name Change After BLP Reporting

They say they’re not changing their name.

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The Southern Baptist Convention has sought to dispel reporting from Big League Politics on the organization’s planned name change, arguing that the institution isn’t formally changing its name.

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But a close look at the American Christian church’s plans relating to its name reveal that it’s played with the idea far more seriously than they’re making it seem.

Reports of a name change first emerged in a Washington Post article published on Tuesday. SBC President JD Greear told the Post that “hundreds of churches” affiliated with the denomination had “committed” to using the phrase “Great Commission Baptist” as an alternative to the denomination’s longtime moniker. The change would come as Greear touts his support of the Black Lives Matter, although he’s been careful in pointing out he doesn’t support any formal organization related to the movement. Greear also is renaming the church he personally pastors with the term.

The SBC’s 2021 convention will also organize under the motto of “We Are Great Commission Baptists.” Sounds a lot like a name change, even if the SBC’s leadership is steadfastly maintaining it isn’t.

The name ‘Great Commission Baptist’ is theologically sound in the Christian religion, but it’s somewhat questionable that the organization’s leader appears to be emphasizing it at a moment in which political correctness is making its entryism into many Christian churches and organizations.

It seems as if the organization’s figurehead is keen to present himself as a liberal-style suburban Evangelical to the Washington Post, but he changed his tune quite quickly when the rank and file membership of Southern Baptist churches learned that he was promoting the idea of a name change.

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