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Kamala Harris Wants To Get Rid of Columbus Day

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Democrat presidential candidate Kamala Harris of California wants to eliminate Columbus Day as a federal holiday.

“Sign me up,” Harris said in response to an inquiry in New Hampshire as to whether she would support re-naming Columbus Day to honor Native Americans, instead.

(READ: BIG LEAGUE EXCLUSIVE: Whistleblower Evidence Shows Kamala Harris Covered Up Illegal Wiretaps).

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BLP reported:

Former San Francisco mayor Willie Brown included an interesting passage in this week’s edition of his “Willie’s World” column for the San Francisco Chronicle:

“I’ve been peppered with calls from the national media about my “relationship” with Kamala Harris, most of which I have not returned.

Yes, we dated. It was more than 20 years ago. Yes, I may have influenced her career by appointing her to two state commissions when I was Assembly speaker.

And I certainly helped with her first race for district attorney in San Francisco. I have also helped the careers of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Gov. Gavin Newsom, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and a host of other politicians.

The difference is that Harris is the only one who, after I helped her, sent word that I would be indicted if I “so much as jaywalked” while she was D.A.

That’s politics for ya.”

Willie Brown’s recollection ends

California senator Harris is under scrutiny for her actions as the state’s attorney general.

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Kamala Harris covered up a wide-ranging surveillance scheme in which a single Riverside County judge ordered hundreds of wiretaps snaring millions of phone calls and thousands of unsuspecting people across the country, according to whistleblower case evidence obtained by Big League Politics.

New evidence shows how then-California attorney general Kamala Harris’ office defied precedent to conceal and obscure the details of this illegal operation, including by “locking” a mandatory annual report on intercepted communications from public disclosure and allegedly changing the numbering system on the official report to make it impossible to identify each wiretap coming out of Riverside County. Many of these wiretaps were never explained and never resulted in action, and targets are still unnamed.

Kamala Harris served as California attorney general from 2011 to 2017, when she took her Senate seat.

Riverside County Superior Court judge Helios Hernandez, appointed by Democrat governor Gray Davis, ordered 624 wiretaps in 2014, almost five times more than any other American judge, and 44,000 people and over 2 million conversations were tapped. Hernandez even got 17 wiretap applications in one day. Some of Hernandez’s wiretaps have been found to be illegal by prosecutors, leading to the dropping of some cases and the surrender of assets seized by the feds. A federal judge said legal standards “could not have been met” with regard to the Riverside County wiretaps. Approximately 18 percent of the more than 4 million conversations wiretapped in the state of California in 2016 were incriminating.

The wiretapping scheme coincided with a period of massive revenue gains for the state of California from civil asset forfeitures overseen by Kamala Harris’ office. In 2014, Riverside County collected more than $3 million in civil asset forfeitures.

Stephanie J. Lacambra, criminal defense staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, is representing a retired California Highway Patrol officer who was targeted with a wiretap, and who still has no idea why.

“It looked like the FBI and DEA were shopping because they could get this one judge in Riverside County” to sign off on wiretap orders, Lacambra told Big League Politics, referring to Riverside County judge Helios Hernandez.

Lacambra that the “specter of impropriety” led to numerous of these cases being dropped nationwide. “It looked like there was not justification for the sheer number of wiretaps coming out of this county.”

Lacambra said that her client’s wiretap “occurred during the time in which this spike in wiretaps was happening in 2015.”

“The problem lies in that the district attorney’s office that had the responsibility of issuing notice to individuals who were targets failed to notify those targets,” Lacambra told Big League Politics, noting that people were completely unaware that they were being wiretapped.

“What we’re doing right now is trying to convince the court to exercise its discretion to release the information” about her client’s wiretap, before going to the next step of a lawsuit.

“In California there is a state law that says the target of a wiretap can ask the court to release the documents…we’re trying to get that information first,” Lacambra said.

Cover Up

In 2015, Kamala Harris’ attorney general’s office made the unprecedented decision to release California’s Electronic Interceptions Report as a “locked” PDF not available to members of the public, according to documents obtained by Big League Politics.

An April 23, 2015 letter on Kamala Harris’ official attorney general stationery denied Lacambra’s firm’s request to see the report.

A deputy attorney general wrote on Harris’ behalf:

“Since that time, our Office has changed its security protocol regarding reports and other documents that are made available electronically to members of the public on our public web site. Now, all such reports and documents appearing on our public website are only made available to members of the public in a locked PDF format. We have made this change in orderto better protect the security and integrity of the data in our public records.

Unfortunately, given our new procedure, we are unable to provide you with an electric copy of the 2014 Electronic Interception report in a Microsoft Word format. We apologize for any inconvenience that this new change may cause for you.”

The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s persistence eventually led to the publication of the 2015 report, but problems persisted.

The report was incomprehensible in the sense that Riverside County wiretap reports did not correspond to the wiretap order numbers, and were not in correct sequential order like other counties, according to a source.

The Riverside County wiretaps had identifying numbers in the report starting at over 1,000, even though there were not more than 1,000 wiretaps from that county in 2014 or 2015, making it impossible to trace or identify some of the wiretaps, including in the case of Lacambra’s client, the retired California Highway Patrol officer. That officer’s issued wiretap number does not correspond with any of the numbers indexed in the report.

 

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POLL: Hispanics Support Big Government Across The Board

Even Hispanics Republicans are to the Left of the Average Republican

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Pew Research released some interesting statistics highlighting Latino voters’ views on national political problems based on a survey they conducted on Latino adults this past December.

Record numbers of Latinos — 32 million — will be voting in the 2020 general election. This exceeds the number of eligible black voters for the first time in history.

According to the results, the majority of Hispanic voters favor more government involvement on issues ranging from minimum wage to gun control.

62 percent of registered voters identify or lean toward the Democrat Party, whereas 34 percent connect with or lean in the direction of the Republican Party.

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Several key findings stood out:

Most Hispanic voters (71%) say the government should do more to solve problems, while 27% say government is doing too many things better left to businesses and individuals.

The findings by Jens Manuel Krogstad, Mark Hugo Lopez and Abby Budiman revealed that 82 percent of Hispanics who identify with or lean Democrat “say the government should do more to solve problems, compared with 51% of those who affiliate with or lean toward the GOP.”

As far as minimum wage is concerned, the three authors found some interesting results

On the minimum wage, a large majority of Hispanic voters (79%) say they favor raising it to $15 an hour, including more than half (56%) who say they strongly favor this change. Majorities in both parties favor raising the minimum wage, though Hispanic Democrats are much more likely than Hispanic Republicans to do so (88% vs. 62%, respectively).

The same Hispanic support for big government held true for healthcare which the authors noted below:

Hispanic voters generally believe the U.S. government should play a role in providing health care to Americans. About seven-in-ten (71%) say it is the federal government’s responsibility to make sure all Americans have health care coverage, including 38% who favor a national health insurance system and 32% who prefer a mix of private and government health care coverage. Around a quarter (28%) say it is not the government’s responsibility to make sure all Americans have health care coverage, though most in this group say they prefer to keep Medicare and Medicaid.

When broken down across partisan lines, there were some key differences between Hispanics Democrats and Hispanic Republicans:

Hispanic Democrats and Republicans have different views on the role government should play in providing health coverage. About eight-in-ten Hispanic Democratic voters (84%) say it is the government’s responsibility to ensure Americans have health care, with 49% supporting a national health insurance system. Meanwhile, about half (51%) of Hispanic Republican voters say it is not the government’s responsibility to ensure universal coverage, though most in this group prefer to keep Medicare and Medicaid.

Interestingly, Hispanic Republicans were considerably to the Left of the average Republican voter on healthcare. 24 percent of Republican voters believe that the government should be responsible for guaranteeing healthcare coverage.

For gun control, there was also a noticeable Hispanic majority in favor of stricter gun laws:

“Around seven-in-ten Hispanic voters (68%) say gun laws should be stricter than they are today, while 24% say current gun laws are about right. Only 7% say gun laws should be less strict. The survey was conducted several months after a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, involving a suspect who said he targeted Mexicans.”

Similarly, there was a sharp partisan gap on gun control among Hispanics:

Among Hispanic Democratic voters, 80% say gun laws should be stricter. Hispanic Republican voters are more evenly divided, with 44% saying gun laws should be stricter and 42% saying gun laws are about right.

In the Republican case, Hispanics Republicans are to the Left of Republican voters on gun control. Only 27 percent of Republican voters want stricter gun laws.

All things considered, continued mass migration will not only ensure eventual Democrat Party domination in the near future, but also a more leftist Republican opposition that now has a big government faction within its ranks.

Graphics from the study can be referenced below:

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