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POLL: Mexicans Support Stronger Controls on Immigration

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According to a survey conducted by The Washington Post and Mexico’s Reforma newspaper, Mexicans are frustrated with mass migration after a year of increased migration from Central America.

More than 6 out of 10 Mexicans claim that migrants are a burden on the country due to them taking away jobs and benefits that belong to Mexicans. 55 percent of Mexicans support deporting migrants who travel by way of Mexico to reach the United States.

This is in contrast to the popular perception of Mexico—a country that is known for the millions of migrants it sends to America—being a country that is receptive towards the surge of Central Americans. Instead, the data show that Mexicans are beginning to disapprove of the massive waves of Central Americans going through their country.

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This survey of 1,200 Mexican adults was carried out after Mexico decided to beef up its immigration enforcement after coming to an agreement with the Trump administration in June to increase enforcement efforts. In exchange, Trump decided to pull back on his threat to impose tariffs on Mexican goods.

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During the last year, Mexico witnessed growing numbers of Central Americans moving through their country to make their way to the U.S. Once at Mexico’s northern border, these migrants waited for months to take advantage of America’s false asylum claims, putting a major strain on local municipalities on the Southern border which BLP reported on.

The Reforma survey uncovered that 7 percent of Mexicans say their country should provide pathways to residency for Central American immigrants traveling through Mexico and making an attempt to enter the U.S. Another 33 percent are in favor of allowing these migrants to temporarily stay in Mexico while the U.S. decides on their admission.

However, a 55 percent majority says they should be deported to their home countries. Indeed, Mexico has every reason to worry about mass migration, since it is often a country that Central American migrants must pass through just to get stateside.

One part of the Trump strategy moving forward should be to cooperate with Mexico in stemming this flow of migrants. After all, they are America’s neighbor and there is a shared interest in trying to tame the flow of migrants.

Mass migration in today’s context of a welfare state is problematic. Europe is already showing signs of what it’s capable of doing to country’s social cohesion when left unchecked.

For that reason, American voters do see it as the #1 issue heading into the 2020 elections. To bring a saner immigration policy to America, the Trump administration will have to work vigorously at the domestic and international level to get immigration under control in our hemisphere.

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Here’s Where Hispanics Will Play a Decisive Role in the 2020 Elections

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In 2020, Hispanics will leave their mark in presidential elections.

During the present election cycle, Hispanics will be the country’s largest ethnic minority in a U.S. presidential contest. 32 million Hispanics will be expected to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election. They will make up 13.3 percent of all eligible voters. That said, the number of Hispanic eligible voters is significantly lower than the 60 million Hispanics who live in the country.

Nationally speaking, 62 percent of Hispanic registered voters identify with or lean towards the Democratic Party  On the other hand, 34 percent hold similar inclinations with the Republican Party.

Pew Research Center highlighted five key facts about the geographic distribution of the Latino vote for the 2020 presidential election:

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Here are five facts about the geography of Latino voters for the upcoming 2020 presidential election:

1 Two-in-three Latino eligible voters live in just five states. California alone holds roughly a quarter of the nation’s Latino electorate, with 7.9 million Latino eligible voters. Texas is second with 5.6 million, followed by Florida (3.1 million), New York (2.0 million) and Arizona (1.2 million).

2 Latinos make up the highest share of eligible voters in New Mexico (43%). The other top states are California (30%), Texas (30%), Arizona (24%) and Florida (20%).

3 Texas’ 20th Congressional District is home to 359,000 Latino eligible voters, the highest number of any congressional district in the country. Texas’ 16th, 34th and 23rd districts, and Florida’s 26th District, round out the top five, each with at least 321,000 Latino eligible voters.

4 California’s 40th District has the nation’s highest share (80%) of Latinos among its eligible voter population. Texas is home to the next four highest districts, where at least seven-in-ten eligible voters in each are Latino: the 34th District (79%), 16th District (77%), 15th District (73%) and the 28th District (71%).

In 26 congressional districts, Latinos represent at least half of all eligible voters. Most are in California (11 districts) and Texas (eight districts). Florida (25th, 26th and 27th districts), Arizona (3rd and 7th districts), New York (15th District) and Illinois (4th District) also are home to congressional districts that meet this threshold.

5 Only about half of the nation’s 60 million Hispanics are eligible to vote – the smallest share of any racial or ethnic group. While the Hispanic population has grown rapidly in recent decades, many are not eligible voters. More than other racial or ethnic groups, many Hispanics are young (18.6 million are under 18 years old) or non-citizen adults (11.3 million, more than half of whom are unauthorized immigrants).

Hispanics will be one of the key constituents that will play a huge role in American politics from here on out. Despite all the media hype about them being a reliable bloc vote because of the GOP’s  supposedly tough stances on immigration restriction, many Hispanics do in fact support tighter controls on immigration. Additionally, in certain crucial swing states such as Florida, Hispanics are beginning to head on over to the Republican side.

Trump’s national populism, not Hispandering, is key in making sure that Democrats don’t turn the Hispanic vote into a dominate segment of its coalition. All things considered, Hispanics will play a pivotal role in leading Donald Trump  to victory on November 3.

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