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REPORT: Beto Wrote A Weird Poem… ‘Oh, Sacred Cow, I Thirst For You, Provide Milk’

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Democrat candidate Beto O’Rourke, formerly known by the moniker Psychedelic Warlord, is under fire for his role in the hacking group Cult of the Dead Cow. Now, some of his poetry is reportedly coming to light, including the poem, “The Song of the Cow.”

Beto’s team has not responded to our request for comment on the content of O’Rourke’s poem “The Song of the Cow.”

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Reuters reported: “In an exclusive interview with this reporter for a forthcoming book about the group, the former U.S. congressman from Texas confirmed that as a youth in El Paso, he belonged to the hacking group known as the Cult of the Dead Cow. He also acknowledged that, during those teenage years, he stole long-distance phone service to participate in electronic discussions. Others in the group committed the same offense and got off with warnings; the statute of limitations ran out long ago. In the group, O’Rourke wrote online essays under the pseudonym “Psychedelic Warlord” that could provide fodder for political supporters and foes alike. One mocked a neo-Nazi, while another was a short piece of fiction from a killer’s point of view.”

Big League Politics reported: “Democrat Texas Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke played bass in a punk rock band called Foss with Cedric Bixler-Zavala, who went on to a career in rock music with other bands.

Bixler-Zavala recalls that Foss intentionally played badly in one gig to stick it to a host who “was a little on the Republican Christian side.” The host allegedly wanted to start an “all-white dude ranch.”

While the “all-white dude ranch” idea would be legitimately racist, assuming it happened, the fact that Bixler-Zavala pointed out the host’s “Republican Christian” viewpoint suggests that O’Rourke’s band was not a fan of these attributes. O’Rourke supports abortion, but the mainstream media is trying to push the narrative that numerous Christians will vote for him.

Cedric Bixler-Zavala recounted his experience with bassist Beto in an interview with Remezcla:

“A side effect of the GOP’s tweets is the renewed attention on the congressman’s old punk band, Foss. The spotlight on the band led many to dig up an old performance of theirs – one of their only publicly available – on a local El Paso cable access show called Let’s Get Real. The clip shows the young band – which included Bixler-Zavala on drums – stalling to start their set, then seemingly fumbling through what can best be described as an art-rock onslaught of distorted noise, much to the chagrin of the buttoned-up host. “We were just taking the piss out of the host,” Bixler-Zavala tells Remezcla over the phone. “The host was a little on the Republican Christian side, and he pulled us aside before taping and told us he wanted to start an all-white dude ranch,” he says, explaining the kind of bigotry they felt from the host and why the band ultimately decided to play around on stage rather than perform one of their actual songs.”

Remezcla passage ends

Here is video of the gig:

 

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Southern Baptist Convention Reverses Course on Name Change After BLP Reporting

They say they’re not changing their name.

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The Southern Baptist Convention has sought to dispel reporting from Big League Politics on the organization’s planned name change, arguing that the institution isn’t formally changing its name.

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But a close look at the American Christian church’s plans relating to its name reveal that it’s played with the idea far more seriously than they’re making it seem.

Reports of a name change first emerged in a Washington Post article published on Tuesday. SBC President JD Greear told the Post that “hundreds of churches” affiliated with the denomination had “committed” to using the phrase “Great Commission Baptist” as an alternative to the denomination’s longtime moniker. The change would come as Greear touts his support of the Black Lives Matter, although he’s been careful in pointing out he doesn’t support any formal organization related to the movement. Greear also is renaming the church he personally pastors with the term.

The SBC’s 2021 convention will also organize under the motto of “We Are Great Commission Baptists.” Sounds a lot like a name change, even if the SBC’s leadership is steadfastly maintaining it isn’t.

The name ‘Great Commission Baptist’ is theologically sound in the Christian religion, but it’s somewhat questionable that the organization’s leader appears to be emphasizing it at a moment in which political correctness is making its entryism into many Christian churches and organizations.

It seems as if the organization’s figurehead is keen to present himself as a liberal-style suburban Evangelical to the Washington Post, but he changed his tune quite quickly when the rank and file membership of Southern Baptist churches learned that he was promoting the idea of a name change.

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