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Sen. Franken claims comic’s privilege in groping saga: ‘Coming from the world of comedy…’

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Sen. Alan S. “Al” Franken (D.-Minn.) issued a new statement Thursday to supplement his previous short explanation about his take on the charge made earlier in the day by Leeann Tweeden that Franken constructed a sexually awkward comedy skit for her to perform with him during their 2006 Middle East USO tour and that Franken insisted on a private rehearsal, where he groped and kissed her.

After she shook off his sexually-tinged advances, Tweeden said Franken began ridiculing her for the rest of the tour–and at one point drew devil horns on a photo of her.

Also after the rehearsal incident, Franken posed for a photo of him groping her breasts as she slept.

Trending: Netflix ‘Cheer’ Star, Joe Biden Surrogate Charged With Producing Child Pornography After Federal Raid

I couldn’t believe it. He groped me, without my consent, while I was asleep.

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I felt violated all over again. Embarrassed. Belittled. Humiliated.

How dare anyone grab my breasts like this and think it’s funny?

I told my husband everything that happened and showed him the picture.

I wanted to shout my story to the world with a megaphone to anyone who would listen, but even as angry as I was, I was worried about the potential backlash and damage going public might have on my career as a broadcaster.

But that was then, this is now. I’m no longer afraid.

https://twitter.com/TimRunsHisMouth/status/931180721477124097

Tweeden told her story on the “McIntyre in the Morning” on Los Angeles radio station KABC 790-AM.

Here is Franken’s second statement posted shortly before 1 p.m. Washington time:

The first thing I want to do is apologize: to Leeann, to everyone else who was part of that tour, to everyone who has worked for me, to everyone I represent, and to everyone who counts on me to be an ally and supporter and champion of women. There’s more I want to say, but the first and most important thing—and if it’s the only thing you care to hear, that’s fine—is: I’m sorry.

I respect women. I don’t respect men who don’t. And the fact that my own actions have given people a good reason to doubt that makes me feel ashamed.

But I want to say something else, too. Over the last few months, all of us—including and especially men who respect women—have been forced to take a good, hard look at our own actions and think (perhaps, shamefully, for the first time) about how those actions have affected women.

For instance, that picture. I don’t know what was in my head when I took that picture, and it doesn’t matter. There’s no excuse. I look at it now and I feel disgusted with myself. It isn’t funny. It’s completely inappropriate. It’s obvious how Leeann would feel violated by that picture. And, what’s more, I can see how millions of other women would feel violated by it—women who have had similar experiences in their own lives, women who fear having those experiences, women who look up to me, women who have counted on me.

Coming from the world of comedy, I’ve told and written a lot of jokes that I once thought were funny but later came to realize were just plain offensive. But the intentions behind my actions aren’t the point at all. It’s the impact these jokes had on others that matters. And I’m sorry it’s taken me so long to come to terms with that.

While I don’t remember the rehearsal for the skit as Leeann does, I understand why we need to listen to and believe women’s experiences.

I am asking that an ethics investigation be undertaken, and I will gladly cooperate.

And the truth is, what people think of me in light of this is far less important than what people think of women who continue to come forward to tell their stories. They deserve to be heard, and believed. And they deserve to know that I am their ally and supporter. I have let them down and am committed to making it up to them.

Congress

BREAKING: Mitch McConnell Pledges to Bring Up Confirmation of New SCOTUS Justice for a Senate Vote

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pledging to bring up a tentative Supreme Court nominee for confirmation before the November election.

President Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.

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McConnell dispelled notions that the situation was similar to the 2016 blocked nomination of Merrick Garland, citing the Republican Majority in the Senate at the time. The President’s party controls the Senate this time around, and it increased its electoral majority in the 2018 election.

Liberally-inclined Republican Senators such as Mitt Romney, Lisa Murkowski, and Susan Collins could prove integral to confirming a SCOTUS nominee. The latter two have already stated that they wouldn’t vote to confirm a new justice during a presidential election season, even if the President’s party controlled the Senate.

Chuck Schumer is already pledging to block a new SCOTUS confirmation “until we have a new President,” suggesting he’s seeking to block Trump from even making a new SCOTUS appointment during his potential second term.

This Supreme Court battle could be one for the ages.

 

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