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Tom Cotton Labels SPLC a Hate Group, Demands IRS Investigation

Cotton has called for the IRS to investigate the tax-exempt status of the political hate group.

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One of America’s most profitable faux-hate fundraising schemes may soon be facing additional scrutiny over its non-profit status from the IRS, after Arkansas’ Senator Tom Cotton called for the agency to investigate the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Cotton sent a letter to the commissioner of the IRS on Tuesday calling for an investigation into the SPLC’s corrupt practices involving the defamation of its political opponents and off-shoring of hundreds of millions of dollars-ostensibly raised to litigate against the supposed ‘hate groups’ the SPLC opposes- to avoid financial transparency.

Cotton represents the most high-ranking government official thus far to recognize the SPLC as a hate group itself, a label which the group wildly and indiscriminately applies to individuals and entities that oppose liberalism and the Democratic Party.

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The Arkansas Republican also appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight on Tuesday to discuss the case for the recognition of the legal group as a hate group itself. Watch here:

Cotton’s call for a tax investigation into the group could represent the culmination of an increasing wave of criticism directed at the Alabama-based organization for corrupt fundraising practices, in addition to workplace cultures of sexual harassment and racism.

Big League Politics has revealed that the organization’s founder, Morris Dees, was fired from his place at the group for sexually harassing young women. 

Dees, a supposed ‘anti-racist’ crusader who at one point supported segregationist George Wallace for President, has also been accused of attempting to molest his stepdaughter, according to documents regarding divorce proceedings. Both the SPLC and Dees have declined to deny the allegations in response to Big League Politics’ request for comment.

Its President, Richard Cohen was also forced to resign, suggesting deep-seated institutional corruption within the leadership of the legal firm.

Cotton’s case for an IRS audit of the SPLC’s finance is a home run. Let’s see the light of transparency illuminate just exactly what is hidden within the darkness surrounding this dubious ‘anti-hate’ group.

The Swamp

Swamp Bureaucrats Try to Oust America First USAID appointee

Disgruntled bureaucrats.

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Bureaucrats at a division of the U.S. Agency for International Development that focuses on conflict prevention are fuming about their new boss.

In fact, they’re so angry that they drafted a lengthy memo detailing their grievances with the aim of getting the Trump administration to take action on their behalf, according to a report by Politico.

The disgruntled officials’ 13-page memo singles out Pete Marocco, the head of USAID’s Bureau for Conflict Prevention and Stabilization.

A USAID official stated that a small group of veteran staffers drafted the memo in the bureau’s Office of Transition Initiatives (OTI). Marocco has voiced his skepticism towards a lot of programs this division runs, which is in line with the America First reluctance of embracing foreign aid programs.

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The memo portrays Marocco as a micromanager who has thrown several wrenches into the bureau’s operations. In addition, the memo accuses Marocco of marginalizing employees and being vague about his orders that are allegedly difficult to implement. According to the complaint, “thousands of hours of staff time” have been “spent unnecessarily and unproductively.”

Furthermore, the complaint alleged that Marocco “has leveraged once-routine administrative processes to reopen previously-approved plans, interrogate and redirect country programs, halt movement on programs, procurements, and people, and inject uncertainty into daily operations and office planning.“ In addition, it contended that Marocco “has eschewed providing direction in writing or through other formal channels, and rarely sent guidance to teams directly implicated. Instead, he has conveyed orders and decisions, sometimes only orally, to individual staff … who then must attempt to relay this information as best they can to colleagues. This has inevitably generated significant confusion over intent and expectations, and made it difficult to confirm decisions or maintain adequate records.”

One of the more unheralded aspects of President Donald Trump’s ascendancy into the White House has been his skepticism towards the efficacy of foreign aid, which has traditionally been plagued with corruption. According to the Brookings Institute, the U.S. government spent roughly $39.2 billion on foreign aid in 2019, with very little results to show for it.

Overall, officials like Marcocco were appointed with the task of re-orienting USAID’s priorities, which ruffled many feathers.

For example, Marocco was against a $2 million extension of an OTI program in Ukraine that senior USAID and State Department officials werenin favor of. The proposal to extend the program has been sitting on Marocco’s desk waiting for the greenlight since he assumed the position in July, according to the complaint. On two occasions he has called for canceling this program and made a request to find out how much the cancellation process would cost. Politco reported that Marocco “hasn’t said what he would want to do instead with the money besides “do something ‘important’ like train and equip the military or police, or work on security sector reform,” according to the memo, which notes that the first suggestion is prohibited by law, while the second is not a USAID priority in Ukraine.”

It’s clear that Marocco is no swamp creature and does not believe in just doling out money to corrupt countries. An America First foreign aid policy would be one of minimal to no foreign aid, and people like Marocco make it easier for us to achieve that goal.

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