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VETO THREAT: Trump Says He’ll Block Democrat Gun Control Scheme

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The Trump Administration is taking a stand against the House’s attempts to implement gun registration.

On Monday, the White House released a statement indicating that President Trump would veto bills, H.R. 8 and H.R, 1112, that would expand so-called “background checks” for all gun purchases if they make it past the House and Senate.

H.R. 8 specifically enacts universal background checks and H.R. 1112 would close the “Charleston loophole” that Dylann Roof used in the 2015 mass shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church to buy a gun.

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For H.R. 8, Democrats have the bipartisan support of Republican Congressmen like Peter King, Brian Fitzpatrick, Brian Mast, Fred Upton, and Chris Smith. Both bills are expected to pass the House but will encounter steep obstacles in Republican-controlled Senate.

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Despite these bills’ innocuous labels, they would ultimately require a national registry to function. And as every gun owner knows, registration is just the first step to gun confiscation.

For justified reasons, the White House expressed its opposition to both bills on the grounds that they violated the Second Amendment. The statement voiced its concern with H.R. 8:

“The extensive regulation required by H.R. 8 is incompatible with the Second Amendment’s guarantee of an individual right to keep arms.”

Then it singled out H.R.1112:

“By overly extending the minimum time that a licensed entity is required to wait for background check results, H.R. 1112 would unduly impose burdensome delays on individuals seeking to purchase a firearm.”

Then the statement concluded with the following:

“If H.R. 8, or H.R. 1112, are presented to the President, his advisors would recommend he veto the bill.”

Since the Newtown shooting in Connecticut, universal gun registration has become the gun control legislation of choice for gun controllers nationwide. Eleven states (California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington) and the District of Columbia currently have universal background checks on the books.

Despite the hype surrounding UBCs, there is reason to be skeptical.

In The War on Guns, John Lott found that UBCs have very little impact in reducing crime, and in subsequent investigations, UBCs actually make it hard for the poor and minorities to effectively arm themselves.

These so-called “universal background checks” are not universal because criminals will avoid them at all costs. On top of that, bills like H.R. 8 would impose more unnecessary financial and legal burdens on gun owners who already have to jump considerable hoops in the first place.

Despite these harsh facts, the gun controllers push on. With the House under their control, they will take advantage of this opportunity to pass gun control out of at least one chamber of Congress for the first time since the Clinton era.

Thankfully, the U.S.’s system of checks and balances will keep the gun control crowd’s anti-gun intentions at bay for the time being.

 

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Here’s Where Hispanics Will Play a Decisive Role in the 2020 Elections

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In 2020, Hispanics will leave their mark in presidential elections.

During the present election cycle, Hispanics will be the country’s largest ethnic minority in a U.S. presidential contest. 32 million Hispanics will be expected to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election. They will make up 13.3 percent of all eligible voters. That said, the number of Hispanic eligible voters is significantly lower than the 60 million Hispanics who live in the country.

Nationally speaking, 62 percent of Hispanic registered voters identify with or lean towards the Democratic Party  On the other hand, 34 percent hold similar inclinations with the Republican Party.

Pew Research Center highlighted five key facts about the geographic distribution of the Latino vote for the 2020 presidential election:

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Here are five facts about the geography of Latino voters for the upcoming 2020 presidential election:

1 Two-in-three Latino eligible voters live in just five states. California alone holds roughly a quarter of the nation’s Latino electorate, with 7.9 million Latino eligible voters. Texas is second with 5.6 million, followed by Florida (3.1 million), New York (2.0 million) and Arizona (1.2 million).

2 Latinos make up the highest share of eligible voters in New Mexico (43%). The other top states are California (30%), Texas (30%), Arizona (24%) and Florida (20%).

3 Texas’ 20th Congressional District is home to 359,000 Latino eligible voters, the highest number of any congressional district in the country. Texas’ 16th, 34th and 23rd districts, and Florida’s 26th District, round out the top five, each with at least 321,000 Latino eligible voters.

4 California’s 40th District has the nation’s highest share (80%) of Latinos among its eligible voter population. Texas is home to the next four highest districts, where at least seven-in-ten eligible voters in each are Latino: the 34th District (79%), 16th District (77%), 15th District (73%) and the 28th District (71%).

In 26 congressional districts, Latinos represent at least half of all eligible voters. Most are in California (11 districts) and Texas (eight districts). Florida (25th, 26th and 27th districts), Arizona (3rd and 7th districts), New York (15th District) and Illinois (4th District) also are home to congressional districts that meet this threshold.

5 Only about half of the nation’s 60 million Hispanics are eligible to vote – the smallest share of any racial or ethnic group. While the Hispanic population has grown rapidly in recent decades, many are not eligible voters. More than other racial or ethnic groups, many Hispanics are young (18.6 million are under 18 years old) or non-citizen adults (11.3 million, more than half of whom are unauthorized immigrants).

Hispanics will be one of the key constituents that will play a huge role in American politics from here on out. Despite all the media hype about them being a reliable bloc vote because of the GOP’s  supposedly tough stances on immigration restriction, many Hispanics do in fact support tighter controls on immigration. Additionally, in certain crucial swing states such as Florida, Hispanics are beginning to head on over to the Republican side.

Trump’s national populism, not Hispandering, is key in making sure that Democrats don’t turn the Hispanic vote into a dominate segment of its coalition. All things considered, Hispanics will play a pivotal role in leading Donald Trump  to victory on November 3.

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