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Alabama’s Doug Jones May Vote to Acquit Trump in Senate Impeachment Trial

Democrats are simply wasting time and ignoring actual policy at this point.

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In the latest sign of the futility of a Democratic impeachment attempt, Alabama Senator Doug Jones said that he may vote to acquit President Donald Trump in a Senate impeachment trial.

Jones spoke on ABC’s ‘This Week’ on Sunday. He was asked about Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s statement claiming that he knew of “one or two Democrats” who would vote against impeachment in a Senate trial.

When asked of his thought process related to impeachment, Jones said the following:

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What I’m trying to do, because quite frankly I didn’t sit in front of the TV set the entire time the last two or three months, I have been trying to read this. I have been trying to see if the dots get connected. If that is the case, I think it’s a serious matter, I think it’s an impeachable matter. But if those dots aren’t connected and there are other explanations that I think are consistent with innocence, I will go that way too.

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Democrats are already the minority party in the senate, and losing votes within their own caucus in impeachment proceedings essentially ensures they’d have no chance to convict the President after ramming an impeachment resolution through the House of Representatives.

Jones is a Democrat in a heavily red state who faces an uphill battle to win reelection in 2020. A vote to impeach the President on spurious accusations revolving around withholding foreign aid from Ukraine would all but ensure he’d lose in a landslide to a Republican, especially considering Alabama political heavyweight and former Senator Jeff Sessions has announced a campaign to win back his old seat.

At this point it seems doubtful if a Senate trial will even occur, considering Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has refused to actually send articles of impeachment to the Senate until she’s guaranteed a “fair trial,” providing Democrats an excuse to avoid politically embarrassing impeachment proceedings in a legislative chamber where they can’t dictate the agenda.

Congress

FLASHBACK: Three Recent Supreme Court Justices Were Confirmed Within 45 Days

There’s ample precedent for a quick confirmation.

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There are 45 days until the November 3rd presidential election, and there’s ample precedent for an expedited confirmation of a Supreme Court Justice in such a timeframe following a vacancy.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg died on Friday, setting up a possible contentious confirmation process to fill her seat. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pledging that a tentative Trump administration nominee for the position will receive a vote on the Senate floor, despite outrage and indignation on the part of progressives falsely maintaining that McConnell is breaking precedent he set by refusing to confirm Merrick Garland. President Obama tried to get Garland confirmed when the opposing party controlled the Senate, a divided government that does not exist in 2020.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg herself was formally nominated by President Clinton on June 22nd, 1993. Her confirmation process began on July 20th, and she was confirmed on August 3rd, with a total of 42 days elapsing between her nomination and confirmation.

John Paul Stevens’ nomination was advanced and confirmed in a speedy 19 days, and Sandra Day O’Connor was confirmed in 1981 in a total of 33 days.

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In fact, every single Supreme Court nomination of the past 45 years was nominated and voted upon within a shorter duration of the time remaining in Donald Trump’s first presidential term.

There’s actually wide precedent for nominating and confirming a Supreme Court justice within the confines of President Trump’s first term, and Democrats are being untruthful or erroneous to suggest otherwise.

McConnell is beginning initial work to advance confirmation hearings, with potential liberal Republicans such as Mitt Romney, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski presenting themselves as possible holdouts. It is possible to approve a judge with 50 votes in the Senate and a Vice Presidential tiebreaker.

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